CategoryCounty Donegal

Tory Island

Tory Island , or simply Tory (officially known by its Irish name Toraigh ), [1]is an island, 14.5 kilometers (9.0 miles) off the northwest coast of County Donegal in Ireland. It is also known in Irish as Tory Island or, historically,Oilean Thu Rí . [2]

Language

The main spoken language on the island is Irish, but English is spoken in order to communicate with visitors. Tory is a part of Donegal Gaeltacht and Ulster Irish is the main Irish dialect in use.

Geography and transportation

The island is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) long and one kilometer (0.6 miles) wide. [3] The 2002 census recorded a population of 133. [4] [5] [6] The population is divided among four towns – An Baile Thoir (East Town), An Baile Thiar(West Town), A LAR (Middletown) and Úrbaile (Newtown). [2] in August 2010, the king of Tory confirmed that there were 96 people living on the island. [citation needed ]

Petrol and diesel are from Tory Oil at prices considerably higher than on the mainland. [7] [ no citation given ]

Tory has no airport, but has regular ferry services from the mainland, County Donegal. [8] The ferry travels daily from April to October, five times a week during the rest of the year. The ferry does not take cars, but can accommodate up to 70 passengers. [9] During the winter months, maritime links not be possible because of rough seas – but from November to March, driving a small 4-seater helicopter from Falcarragh to Tory every other Thursday. [ Needed citation ]

History

antiques

In the apocryphal history of Ireland Lebor Gabála Érenn, Tory Island, was the site of conand’s Tower, a stronghold of the Fomorians, before being defeated by Nemedians in a great battle on the island. The latter Fomorian King Balor of the Evil Eye also lived here. [10] Balor would imprison Ethlinn in a tower built on top of Tor Mór (or luck mother in the Old Irish, meaning that the high tower). Tor Mór is the island’s highest point.

A monastery was founded on Tory in the 6th century by Colmcille. The monastery dominated life on the island until 1595, when it was sacked and destroyed by English troops wage a war of repression against local chiefs.The monastery’s bell tower is the largest structure in order to survive and was built in the 6th or 7th century. [ Citation needed ]

Early Modern History

In 1608, the siege of Tory Island, one of the last cases of O’Doherty revolt took place when a surviving group of rebels took refuge in the castle, only to start killing each other to secure enbenådning.

The Battle of Tory Island, the last action in the Irish rebellion in 1798, took place in the sea nearby.

“The King of Tory,” Patsy Dan Rodgers, waiting near the harbor welcoming visitors to the island

recent history

On October 27, 1914, the British lost their first battleship of World War I: The British super-dreadnought battleship HMS Audacious (23,400 tonnes) was reduced from Tory Island, through a minefield as the armed German merchant cruiser Berlin . The loss was kept an official secret in Britain until 14 November 1918 (3 days after the end of the war). The reduction was witnessed and photographed by passengers on the RMS Olympic sister ship the RMS Titanic .

Since 1950 the island has been home to a small community of artists, and has its own art gallery. The English artist Derek Hill was associated with Tory artist colony. [11]

Reflects a long tradition, is a “king” was elected by consensus islanders. The current Rí Thoraí (Irish for “King of Tory”) is a painter Patsy Dan Rodgers (Patsaí Dan Mac Ruaidhrí ) .Kungen has no formal powers, but the duties of being a spokesman for the island community and welcoming people to the island. [12]

The power generated on the island today from three diesel generators. [13]These have a total capacity of 4 MW and burn through about 500 liters of fuel every day. [ Citation needed ]

Public attention was focused on the island in 2009 as a one-time resident received a payout after a trial after his house was demolished and the grounds as a parking space. [14] In 2015, the island’s only coffee shop destroyed by fire. [15]

demography

The table below presents data on Tory Island population is taken from theDiscover Islands Ireland (Alex Ritsema, Collins Press, 1999) and census Ireland. Bills in Ireland before 1841 are not complete and / or accurate.

historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1841 399
1851 402 + 0,8%
1901 335 -16,7%
1951 257 -23,3%
Year Pop. ±%
1996 169 -34,2%
2002 133 -21,3%
2006 142 + 6,8%
2011 144 + 1,4%
Source: John Chambers. “Islands – Change in population 1841 – 2011”.Irishislands.info. Retrieved February 22, 2015.

Tourism

Tory Island has a number of historical and mythological sites:

  • Dun Bhaloir (Balor Fort) is located on the island’s east side. This peninsula is surrounded on three sides by 90-meter (295-foot) cliffs.Fort Balor reached only by crossing a narrow isthmus, defended by four earthen walls. [16]
  • A Eochair Mhor (The big key) is a long, steep-sided spur jutting out from the eastern side of the peninsula and ending in a crag called a Tor Mór (the big rock). Spur has prominent rocky pinnacles – these are called “Balor soldiers” ( Saighdiúirí Bhaloir ). They give the spur a ‘toothed’ appearance and contribute to the name, “The big key.”
  • The Wishing Stone is a steep flat-topped rock beside the northern cliff face Balor Fort. Traditionally, a wish granted to anyone foolhardy enough to step onto the rock, or who succeeds throwing three stones on it.
  • A Cloigtheach (Bell Tower) is the largest structure to have survived the destruction of the monastery (see history section above). The tower was built in the 6th or 7th century.
  • Tau Cross (a t-shaped cross) is believed to originate from the 12th century. It is one of only two Tau crosses in Ireland (the other in Kilnaboy, County Clare).
  • Móirsheisear (Grave of the Seven): Móirsheisear, which actually translates as ‘big six’ – an archaic term for seven – is the tomb of seven people, six men and a woman, who drowned when their boat capsized off Scoilt a Mhóirsheisear (the cleft of seven) on the island’s northwest coast. According to local superstition, clay from the woman’s grave has the power to ward off pests. [16]
  • The lighthouse stands at the western end of the island, was built between 1828 and 1832 to a design by George Halpin, a famous designer Irish lighthouses. In April 1990, the lighthouse was automated. The lighthouse is one of three in Ireland where a reference station for Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) are installed. The lighthouse is at coordinates 55 ° 16.357’N 8 ° 14.964’W
  • Torpedo: a torpedo can be seen midway between Baile Thiar and An Baile Thoir. It washed ashore during World War II and defused and erected at its present location. [16]

Flora and fauna

The island is an important bird area. [17] It is a nesting site for corn crakes (Crex crex ), a globally endangered species whose numbers have fallen by the intensification of agriculture. In 2007, registered Tory Island 18 calling males, down from a maximum of 34 calling males the past year 2003. In addition to its native bird life, the island records many vagrants. [18]

Ancient records of the flora and fauna of this island can be found in Hyndman. S notes about the history of the island [19] Algae are available locally include: Fucus vesiculosus , Fucus nodosus , Himanthalia lorea ,Laminaria digitata , Rhodomenia laciniata , Plocamium coccineum , Ptilota plumosa , Conferva rupestrus , Codium tomtntosum , Codium adha’s The Dr. Harvey. [19]

The island has no trees because of its high winds. [20]

See also

  • Ireland portal
  • islands portal
  • List of abbeys and priories in County Donegal

References and further reading

  1. Hoppa upp till: en b cheating (Gaeltacht Districts) Order 2004
  2. Jump up to: ab Tory Islanders, a 1978 ethnographic account of R. Fox
  3. Jump up ^ A place of enchanting beauty – BBC News article
  4. Jump up ^ CSO.ie – 2002 Census
  5. Jump up ^ Geological Survey of Ireland – Draft Groundwater Body Report – September 2005
  6. Jump up ^ Donegal County Council Report – Taobh tires (a better library service for rural areas) – July 2003
  7. Hoppa upp^ Pumps.ie – Tory Oil, West Town, Tory Island
  8. Jump up ^ Ferries departurt from Magheroarty and Bunbeg, with occasional traffic from Portnablath. The shortest crossing (Magheroarty to Tory Island) takes about 45 minutes. Oileanthorai.com – Official Tory Island Tourism Site – Travel details
  9. Jump up ^ Tory Island Ferry, County Donegal
  10. Jump up ^ GH Kinahan “Donegal Folk-lore. Ballor of the evil eye ” Folk-Lore Journal . Volume 5, the 1894th
  11. Jump up ^ Funeral arrangements artist Derek Hill – RTÉ News article July 31, 2000
  12. Jump up ^ “Patsy Dan Rodgers – Tory Island artist, musician and King of Tory, County Donegal” .Patsydanrodgers.littleireland.ie. Retrieved November 10, 2008.
  13. Jump up ^ Navigator – Tory Island | Island life
  14. Jump up ^ Telegraph.co.uk – Hotel turned director home to a parking lot – November 11, 2009
  15. Jump up ^ Tory Island Cafe destroyed by fire
  16. ^ Jump up to: abc Oileanthorai.com – Official Tory Island Tourism Website – Attractions
  17. Jump up ^ BirdLife International (2015) Important Bird Areas factsheet: Tory Island. Retrieved from http: //www.birdlife.org on 17 June 2015
  18. Jump up ^ birds and wildlife in Tory Island, brochure published by BirdWatch Ireland
  19. ^ Jump up to: ab Hyndman, GC 1852nd . Remarks about the natural history of Tory Island Ulster J.Archaeol. 1 : 34-3
  20. Hoppa upp^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/irish/articles/view/359/english

Slieve League

Slieve League , sometimes Slieve Leag or Slieve Liag (Irish: Sliabh Liag), [1] is a mountain on the Atlantic coast of County Donegal, Ireland. At 601 meters (1,972 ft), it has some of the highest sea cliffs on the island of Ireland.[2] Although less known than the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Slieve League cliffs reaching almost three times higher.

Den Belfast natura Robert Lloyd Praeger skrev 1939:

A long mountain at nearly 2,000 feet, steep on its northern side, has been devoured by the sea to the south side forms a precipice likewise falling on this side right into the Atlantic Ocean from the long knife edge that forms the top. Travers of this ridge is the “One Man’s Path”, one of the most remarkable walks available in Ireland – not really dangerous, but needs a good head and careful progress on a stormy day …. The northern cliff, which drops 1,500 feet in Coombs that surrounds the small Lough Agh, houses the majority of alpine plants of Slieve League, the most diverse group of Alpine’s available anywhere in Donegal. [3]

The road to the viewpoint

Slieve League is often photographed from a viewpoint called Bunglass. It can be reached by a narrow road that departs from Teelin. The final few kilometers this road built along a cliff and includes several places where it shows on the crest of a rise.

Photo gallery

  • Slieve League East end
  • Expanded view of the east side of Slieve League
  • En mans Path
  • looking down
  • Across the top

See also

  • Croaghaun , havsklippor på ön Achill Island

References

  1. Jump up ^ Marshall, David (2006). Best walks in Ireland . London: Frances Lincoln, p. 139. ISBN 978-0-7112-2420-9.
  2. Jump up ^ “road tripping on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way ‘. Travel addicts. June 22, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  3. Jump up ^ Praeger, Robert Lloyd (1997). The way I went: an Irishman in Ireland . Cork: Collins Press, p. 41. ISBN 978-1-898256-35-9

The Rosses

The Rosses (officially known by its Irish name, Na Rosa , [1] in the genitiveNa Rosann ) is a geographical and social area in the west of County Donegal, Ireland, with a population of over 7000 centered on the town of Dungloe, which serves as the educational, shopping and commercial center for the area. Defined by physical borders in the form of rivers, as well as history and language, the area has a distinct identity, separate from the rest of Donegal.The extensive region situated between the parish of Gweedore in the north and the town of Glenties in the south. Much of the Rosses is in Gaeltacht, which means that Irish is the spoken language. The Rosses, Cloughaneely and Gweedore, known locally as ” the three parishes ” with 16,000 Irish speakers, together form a social and cultural region different from the rest of the county, with Gweedore serves as the main center for socializing and industry. [2] [3] Gaeltacht lair is another Irish-speaking area.

Irish

The following is a list of electoral divisions in the area:

  1. En Clochan Liath (1785) (15%)
  2. Anagaire (2138) (55%)
  3. Great Arran (529) (62%)
  4. Inis Mhic en Rutland (1410) (9%)
  5. En Duchoraidh (78) (34%)
  6. Lettermacaward en Ward (650) (19%)
  7. En Links (615) (15%)
  8. Cro Birch (170) (60%)

Culture

Once a predominantly Irish -speaking area in recent generations, English has become increasingly common. Irish is still widely used in some areas, including parts of the island of Arranmore, the townland of Ranafast and the village of Annagry. In some areas, the hills around Dungloe, around Loughanure and in the pockets of Doochary and Lettermacaward, the Irish dominant.

Locals are said to have a preference for the Gaelic football of football, which is often the case in rural areas of the country. The area field a number of football clubs, both in football and Gaelic football. Keadue Rovers from lower Rosses has traditionally been the area’s strongest football teams, while Dungloe has been the strongest in Gaelic football. There is also a strong tradition of songwriting in the area, Seán McBride (1906-1996) from Cruit Island wrote the popular song “home of Donegal”.

There are links between the people of the Rosses and Scotland, Glasgow in particular because of the economic need for emigration in the past and the strong ties forged over generations as a result. Many people from The Rosses, like people from other parts of County Donegal also has settled istaden Derry, especially since the late 1840s.

Geography

The area is bounded by the river Gweebarra to south, Gweedore River to the north, the mountains and Derryveagh Gweebarra River (Doochary Bridge) to the east and the Atlantic Ocean in the west. The name comes from “Rose”, the Irish word for cape. The area is a rocky barren landscape, studded with a myriad of lakes and bays in the sea.

Transport

The Rosses Donegal has only airport in Carrickfinn. Various coach companies serving the area.

History

The Rosses has been inhabited since ancient times, and the old church of St Crona in Termon near Dungloe has been dated to the 6th century. It was the site of a monastery founded by St Crona, a cousin of the Royal Saint Columcille, founder of the monastic settlement on Iona, and was the center of the parish Temple Crone.

In the 16th century, a number of ships from the Spanish Armada sank off or landed off the coast.

economy

Historically, The Rosses has relied heavily on the hospitality, tourism and the fishing industry as the mainstay of its economy. The area has its own domestic food chain called the Copesom has been very successful. There is very little manufacturing industry in Rosses apart from a few companies in Dungloe.

COPE is a cooperative indigenous to the area, with two large stores in Dungloe (one photo) and several others around the other parts of the Rosses.

Tourism

The area claims a large part of Donegal tourism revenue, because of its famous landscape [4] and many festivals, including Mary from Dungloe International Festival. There is a very strong tradition of marching bands emanating from the region; the area has many All-Ireland championship bands in all grades and disciplines. [5] [6]

Notable people from Rosses

  • Packie Bonner, past Ireland goalkeeper
  • Goats are not straight, folk bands
  • Niall O’Donnell, lexikograf
  • Daniel O’Donnell, singer
  • Peadar O’Donnell, socialist and writer
  • Pat the Cope Gallagher , MEP
  • Margo, singer
  • Séamus Ó Grianna, writer
  • Seosamh Mac Grianna, writer
  • Skara Brae, folk band

Townlands i Rosses

  • Annagry ( Anagaire )
  • Braade ( Braade )
  • Burton ( sections en Crescent )
  • Carrickfinn ( Carrick Fhinne Eller Carrick Finn )
  • Crolly ( Croithlí ) (half of which is located in Gweedore)
  • Doochary ( An Dúchoraidh )
  • Dungloe ( Dungloe )
  • Keadue ( Keadue )
  • Kincasslagh ( Above Caslach )
  • Lettermacaward / Letterkenny ( Leitir Mhic en Bard )
  • Loughanure ( Lake en Newry )
  • Maghery ( Year Mhachaire )
  • Meenbanad ( Meenbanad )
  • Mullaghduff ( Top Black )
  • Ranafast ( Rannafast )
  • Roshine

Islands

  • Arranmore ( Arranmore )
  • Harp ( The Croft )
  • Iniscaoragh ( Mutton )
  • Inisfree ( Inishfree )
  • Owey Island ( students Slab )

See also

County Galway

  • Galway City Gaeltacht
  • Connemara Gaeltacht
  • South Connemara
  • Aran Islands
  • Joyce Country

County Donegal

  • Gaoth Dobhair
  • Cloughaneely
  • Gaeltacht en lya

County Kerry

  • West Kerry Gaeltacht

County Mayo

  • Erris and Achill Gaeltacht

External links

  • Gaeltacht Irish language 2007

References

  1. Hoppa upp ^ placen (Gaeltacht Districts) Order 2004
  2. Hoppa upp^http://www.donegaldemocrat.ie/news/cloughaneely_1_1986720
  3. Jump up ^ http://www.letterkennypost.com/2007/05/page/2/
  4. Hoppa upp^ http://www.donegalgameanglers.com/home/index.php?id=73
  5. Hoppa upp^ http://www.nwipp-newspapers.com/DN/free/305192561911347.php
  6. Hoppa upp^ http://www.burtonport.net/Page3.html

St Eunan’s Cathedral, Raphoe

St Eunan Cathedral (also known as Raphoe Cathedral) is one of two cathedral churches United Diocese of Derry and Raphoe in the Church of Ireland. It is in Raphoe, County Donegaloch is dedicated to Saint Eunan (Adomnán of Iona) (627/8 – 704), who was Abbot of Iona (679-704). The second pin Cathedral St Columb’s Cathedral.

The oldest part of the present building is the southeast corner, which goes back to the 12th century. The rest of the cathedral is a mixture of progressive remodeling and changes dating from the 17th to the late 19th centuries. A major restoration, almost a reconstruction of the medieval cathedral was taken care of by The Rt. Reef. Dr. George Montgomery around 1605. [1]Montgomery had been chaplain to King James I, and was nominated not only Bishop of Raphoe, but Clogher and Derry simultaneously.

After centuries of modifications and restorations, much of the current building dates from the 1730s. The entrance is through the porch under the tower was built in 1738 by Bishop Forster (1716-1744).

By the 1870s the building had once been mistreated and neglected. It attracted adverse criticism by many church people and ecclesiologists. A high church architect, Sir Thomas Drew, described the cathedral as “the most neglected church in the diocese but is located in the richest part of Donegal.”

In 1892 Drew was asked to initiate a plan for restoration that uncovered a large part of the medieval fabric while “medievalizing” most of the rest of byggnaden.Katedralen retains characteristic of many of these medieval buildings where larger bodies of priests offered more elaborate liturgies of the quire or chancel is longer than denlånghuset.

funerals

  • Alexander Cairncross (Archbishop)
  • Alexander Montgomery (1720-1800) – “Old Sandy”, MP för County Donegal i 32 år.

Gallery

  • St Eunan Cathedral, Raphoe
  • Entrance doors in the Cathedral
  • St Eunan Cathedral, Raphoe

See also

  • Dean of Raphoe
  • Bishop of Derry and Raphoe
  • Cathedral of St. Eunan and St. Columba in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Raphoe

References

  1. Hoppa up^ http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/heritage-towns/the-heritage-towns-of-don/raphoe/st.-eunans-cathedral-raph/

Raphoe

Raphoe (/ r æ f oʊ / Irish: Ráth Bhoth ) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland.It is the largest city in the fertile district of East Donegal called Laggan, as well as giving its name to the Barony of Raphoe and although the Catholic Diocese of Raphoe and the Church of Ireland (or Anglican) diocese Derry and Raphoe.

The Burn Deele (Irish: An Daoil ; also spelled in English as Dale Burn) is aburn (a small river) that flows a short distance south of Raphoe. Burn Deele flows eventually, through the village Ballindrait, the River Foyle, just north of Lifford.

Name

Raphoe , historically Raffoe , [2] comes from the Irish Ráth Bhoth , which consists of the words Ráth (fast) and two (hut). This refers likely mud and wattle huts surrounded by a strong fortified hill. [3] It is believed these huts were built by monks in the early Christian period.

History

The rich farmland around Raphoe has been inhabited and cultivated for thousands of years, and evidence of this can be seen through monuments such Beltany Circle, just off staden.Domarringen is one of the largest in Ireland with a diameter of 44 meters (165 feet) and consists of more than sixty blocks in all. The site is believed to date to about 2000 BC, and it was originally a closed cairn. Its name is believed to be linked to the Celtic festival of fertility called “Beltane”. [4]

Around 550 AD Columba (also known as Colmcille), one of the three patron saints of Ireland, founded a monastic settlement in området.Denna website has been further developed by his relative Eunan, which gives its name to the city’s cathedral and is the patron saint of the Diocese of Raphoe.

1198, John de Courcy, a Norman knight who had invaded Ulster in 1177, returned to County Donegal to devastate Inishowen and road ruined churches on Ardstraw, County Tyrone and Raphoe. [5]

The design of the modern city is traced to the Ulster Plantation in the early 17th century, when the city was granted English and Scottish settlers. It was these settlers who laid out the town with “Diamond” in the center, in a similar way as other Plantation cities somDerry and Donegal.

Raphoe Castle

Main article: Raphoe Castle

Built in the 1630s as the Bishop’s Palace, the “castle”, which is now a ruin, was besieged during the Irish rebellion in 1641, was captured by Cromwell’s troops in 1650 and was injured by supporters of King James II and VII of the 1689th Although still awaiting restoration, Raphoe Castle is probably the most impressive castles in Donegal. In 1633, John Leslieöversattes from the Scottish look of the islands to become Bishop of Raphoe. Married at the age of 67, absorbing the Bishopric of Clogher at the age of 90, dominated the Leslie area until his death, aged 100 in 1671. Feeling threatened in its new location, he built himself a new palace on a hill overlooking the city using stone from an old Round Tower in 1637. This proved fortuitous when the rebellion broke out in 1641, and the bishop was forced to shelter in the “castle” as it has come to be known, until relieved by Lagganeer army. Eight years later, Leslie, royalist besieged by Cromwellian troops. This time, he was forced to surrender, but unlike almost any other bishop in Ireland survived Leslie and returned to his See of the restoration in 1660. A leading figure in the established church, Bishop Leslie was no friend of either Catholic or non-conformist . 1664, he ordered four dissenting Presbyterian ministers to appear before his court, and when they did not appear, had them arrested and imprisoned in Lifford prison. [6] A century later, in 1798, the castle was attacked again, this time by the United Irishmen, three of whom were killed.The castle was destroyed in a fire in 1838 [7]

Raphoe Cathedral

Main article: St Eunan’s Cathedral, Raphoe

St. Columcille and St. Eunan ninth Abbot of Iona, had churches in Raphoe in the 5h and 6th century. Several 9th century boulders can be found in the porch and in the north wall of the present cathedral. The southeast corner is the 12th century. The last building is from the 1730s. Supper plate is also noteworthy.

Notes bishops including Bishop George Montgomery, the first Protestant bishop 1605-1610, a Scotsman, who was mainly involved in regaining church lands, and Bishop Andrew Knox 1611-1633, which started to repair and rebuild the cathedral. A stone inscribed “And. Knox II. Epi. Cura “, into the porch, commemorates him. Bishop John Leslie had previously been a soldier and had his own private army which he led in battle. Bishop Philip Twysden, 1747-1752, spent much time in Raphoe but squandered the family fortune in London; According to recent reports, he was shot while robbing a stagecoach.

Sandy Montgomery, a kinsman of Bishop Montgomery is in the cemetery.His inscription reads: “Here lyeth Build Alexander Montgomery, Esq., Who departed this life 29 September 1800, aged 78. He represented this once independent country, 32 years” [6]

Beltany Stone Circle

Main article: Beltany paving

On top of Beltany Hill, just over one mil from Raphoe where stands one of the finest stone circles in Ireland. Reputed older than Stonehenge, consists of 64 standing stones in an original 80. The stones vary in height from 4 feet to 9 feet (1.2-2.7 meters) while the diameter of the circle is 145 feet (44.2 meters). To the SE of the circle is a standing stone 6 feet (2 meters) high.Beltony is a corruption of Baal tine, fire Baal; This suggests that the inhabitants of this area worshiped Baal, the sun god and ruler of nature.Tradition tells us that the most important ceremonies were performed at the summer solstice; a sacred fire was lit in the middle of the circle of stones, representing the stars and the fire of the sun god Baal. [8]

Religion

The town lends its name to both the Roman Catholic Church and Ireland diocese, which covers almost all except the very southern part of County Donegal, including Inishowen liksomCounty Londonderry and the northern part of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland. Raphoe status has declined significantly in recent centuries, however, with the Anglican diocese merged with Derry, while the Roman Catholic bishop now has his See in the larger town of Letterkenny. The Church of Ireland Cathedral, built on the site of Columba monastery, named after St. Eunan (which is the Roman Catholic cathedral in the letter). There is also a Presbyterian Church in Ireland in Raphoe.

Transport

Raphoe railway station opened on 1 January 1909, finally closed on 31 January 1959. [9]

The nearest railway station is run by Northern Ireland Railways and runs from Derry / Londonderry railway station via Coleraine to Belfast Central Station and Belfast Great Victoria Street Railway Station. The strategic Belfast-Derry railway line is to be upgraded to facilitate more frequent trains and improvements of the permanent way track and signaling to allow faster services.

Training

Raphoe has two secondary schools and two primary schools. Royal and Prior elementary school is the Protestant ethos Deele College is non-denominational. [10]

recent history

In recent years, Raphoe come under the media spotlight following the establishment of Morris Court to investigate allegations of corrupt and dishonest police in the county vidGarda Síochána. Tribunal’s second report in conjunction with the Garda trying to design a local publican, Frankie McBrearty, for the murder of cattle dealer Richie Barron. [11]

On 27 August 2005, the first major Royal Black Preceptory demonstration was held in Ireland in Raphoe, although local preceptories have rolled in the county for decades. [12]

Gerry Robinson is an Irish businessman and TV personality currently living in Raphoe. He is the former non-executive chairman of Allied Domecq and free-Chairman / CEO of Granada. He owns a farm on the outskirts of Raphoe named Oakfield Park, which includes a Georgian mansion and a botanical garden with a 15 (381 mm) gauge [13] Railway, Difflin Lake Railway. The gardens and the railway is open to the public.

Notable people

  • Admiral of the Fleet Sir James Hawkins-Whitshed, 1st Bt. , Flag officer in the British Royal Navy who served in the American, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars.
  • Paul Hegarty
  • Frank McBrearty, Sr., businessman targeted by police misconduct
  • McBrearty Frank, Jr. , Former County Mayor of County Donegal
  • Chloe Magee, professional badminton player and Olympic competitor
  • Conor O’Devany, bishop and martyr
  • Half Hung MacNaghten, Ulster-Scots landowners, player and convicted murderer
  • Sir Gerry Robinson, former non-executive chairman of Allied Domecq and free-Chairman / CEO of Granada.

See also

  • List of towns and villages in Ireland
  • Dunduff Castle, South Ayrshire

References 

  1. Hoppa up^ http://www.donegalcoco.ie/NR/rdonlyres/30A6B96A-C356-4738-9DEC-902E05A9286F/0/OverallCensusUpdate.pdf
  2. Jump up ^ placental Database of Ireland (see archives)
  3. Jump up ^ In and around Raphoe published in 1999
  4. Jump up ^ Noonan, D: “Castles and heritage sites in Ireland”, page 137. Aurum Press, 2001
  5. Jump ^ DeBreffny, D & Mott, G (1976). The churches and monasteries of Ireland. London: Thames & Hudson. pp. 60-61.
  6. ^ Jump up to: ab [1] Filed 25 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. Jump up ^ Noonan 2001, p.146.
  8. Jump up ^ Beltony Stone Circle. Askaboutireland.ie. Retrieved on 23/07/2013.
  9. Jump up ^ “Raphoe station” (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways. Pulled 11/22/2007.
  10. Jump up ^ Deele College, Raphoe | (074) 91 45493 -. Deelecollege.ie (04.23.2013). Retrieved on 23/07/2013.
  11. Jump up ^ Irish Examiner : “Morris Tribunal condemns garda negligence; June 2, 2005. Seen 2008-04-14
  12. Jump up ^ RTÉ News: “Royal Black Preceptory keeps Donegal parade”;27 August 2005. Seen 2008-04-14
  13. Jump up ^ Oakfield Park – Train

Ramelton

Ramelton (Irish: Ráth Mealtain ) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. Its population is 1212 (2011).

Ramelton is situated at the mouth of the river Lennon, 11 km north of Letterkenny and 4km east of Milford, on the western shore of Lough Swilly.The city name from Ráth Mealtain , (Irish for “fort Mealtan”), an early Gaelic chief. The fort is said to lie under the ruins of a medieval castle of O’Donnell, the ruling family in West Donegal before their exile to the European continent in the 1607th

Ramelton was settled by English and Scottish planters during the Ulster Plantation of the 17th century and is the site of the oldest Presbyterian Church in Ireland.

Ramelton har också en Church of Ireland Church of St Paul, Parish of Tullyaughnish.

The city was the setting for the 1995 TV series The Hanging Gale , who told me about the potato famine of the 19th century. The city hosts the Lennon Festival, a village fair, since 1970. Ramelton is a Fáilte Ireland designated Heritage Town.

facilities

Ramelton served by many shops and services in town. Ramelton Town Hall was built in the late 19’s and still has an important role in society today.

Notable people

  • William C. Campbell, researcher, Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine in 2015 [2]
  • Roy Greens [3]
  • Dave Gallaher, the All Blacks rugby captain, author and WW1 soldier
  • Arthur Gwynn, cricket and rugby union player
  • Lucius Gwynn, cricket and rugby union player
  • John Tudor Gwynn, cricketers
  • Robert Gwynn, cricketers
  • Catherine Black, a private nurse to King George V
  • Conrad Logan, professional football player
  • Francis Makemie, priest, founder of Presbyterianism in the United States
  • William McAdoo , American partiet politiker
  • Basil McCrea, MLA, leader of NI21 in the Northern Ireland Assembly
  • Walter Patterson, first British governor of Prince Edward Island

See also

  • List of towns and villages in Ireland
  • List of cities in Northern Ireland

References

  1. Hoppa upp^http://cso.ie/en/media/csoie/census/documents/census2011vol1andprofile1/Table%205.pdf
  2. Jump up ^ “Irish researchers win Nobel Prize for medicine.”
  3. Jump up ^ “The Irish still love their newspapers.” The Guardian.Guardian Media Group. August 14, 2010. Retrieved 14 August of 2010.The Irish love to read newspapers, whether national or local. It is a joy to see the papers piled high on my local store in Donegal town of Ramelton in the morning and note their disappearance of the evening.

Mount Errigal

[3] Errigal (Irish: An Earagail , possibly meaning “oratory”) [1] is a 751 meters (2,464 ft) mountain near Gweedore in County Donegal, Ireland. [1] It is the highest peak iDerryveagh Mountains, the highest peak County Donegal, and the 76th highest peak in Ireland. [1] Errigal is also the most southern, steepest and highest mountain range, known as the “seven sisters” by locals. The Seven Sisters include Muckish, Crocknalaragagh, Aghla Beg, Ardloughnabrackbaddy, Aghla more, Mackoght and Errigal. The nearest stop is Mackoght, which is also known as Little or Wee Errigal Errigal (Irish: an Earagail Bheag ).

Errigal is well known for the pink glow of the quartzite in the sun. [1] Another noted the quality is the ever-changing shape of the mountain, depending on which direction you view it from. Errigal voted “Ireland’s most iconic Mountain” by Walking & Hiking Ireland in 2009. [4]

climbing Errigal

The mountain is usually climbed from the car park off the R251 road. The trail starts from the beginning of by crossing the heavily eroded and marshy ground against a visible trail through the glossy scree from where the climb proper starts. After reaching the top, people tend to go short but exposed walk along the “One Man’s Pass” that leads to the other and the lower of the two summits. There is no special equipment to climb the mountain, but caution is advised.

In popular culture

  • In the 2008 film Hunger , protagonist Bobby Sands Errigal describes as a“beautiful sight” .
  • Pictures of a foggy Errigal used in the music video for In A Lifetime by Clannad and Bono in 1985. [5] It has also appeared in several music videos by local singer Enya, especially in the video for “How can I keep from singing? “.
  • Several scenes from the 2011 film Your Highness shot at Errigal. [6]
  • The goats are not straight song “Las Vegas (In the hills of Donegal)” contains the line, “To stand on top of Errigal, would give me so exciting” .
  • The Irish composer Vincent Kennedy set the mountain on music in 2012 as part of his music for The Happy Prince in a piece titled “Snow Errigal”

Gallery

  • The view from Errigal.
  • Errigal as seen from Slieve Snaght.
  • Ascending Mount Errigal.
  • Errigal as seen from the Rosses.
  • An aerial view of Errigal and Gweedore.
  • Abandoned church at the foot of Errigal.
  • Errigal as seen frånCloughaneely.

See also

  • List of Irish counties with the highest point

References

  1. ^ Jump up to: abcdef mountainviews
  2. Jump up ^ Peak Bagger
  3. Jump up ^ Ordnance Survey Ireland – the name is “Errigal” and the word “Mount” should not be used at all even in the title of the article
  4. Jump up ^ http://www.walkingandhikingireland.com/?p=3
  5. Jump up ^ http://www.clannad.net/concertoverview.htm
  6. Jump up^http://homepage.eircom.net/~weebinnians2/webpages/Newsletters/Newsletter%2020090913_FestivalEdition.htm

Malin Head

Malin Head (Irish: Cionn Mhálanna ), located on the Inishowen Peninsula, County Donegal, Ireland, and is the northernmost point of the island of Ireland. The northernmost tip is uddensom called Banba crown located at latitude 55.38ºN. [1] Malin Head gives its name to the Malin sea. There is a weather station on the head, which is one of 22 such stations whose reports are transmitted as part of the BBC shipping forecast.

Banba crown on Malin Head is the most northerly point of the Irish mainland. [2] Banba was one of the mythical queens of Ireland. Banba Crown is about 16 km (10 mi) north of the village of Malin. The island Inishtrahull is further north, is located about 10 km (6 mi) north-east of Malin Head.Further north still is the northernmost landfall in Ireland, Tor Beg rock.

urban

To the North East Inistrahull Island can be seen. The first lighthouse on the island was put into operation in 1813, and the light flashes every 30 seconds.

Above Banba crown in the east is Ballyhillion beach, a unique elevated beach scheme of international scientific importance. [ Citation needed ] The very different beaches show the changing relationship between the sea and the land from the time when the glaciers began to melt, some 15,000 years ago.At the time, County Donegal was depressed by the weight of an enormous ice, so the level of the sea, in relation to today’s beach was up to 80 feet higher than today.

Wartime use

A military watchtower built in Banba Crown in 1805, during the Napoleonic Wars. Around 1902, a signal station, also built on Banba Crown, quite close to the old Napoleonic vakttorn.Båda these buildings still stand.

During World War II, the Irish government allowed the British government to place two radio finders at Malin Head. This top-secret operation was mentioned in The Cranborne report. RDF equipment used to monitor the submarine and aerial activity in the North Atlantic.

After the war, the site became a weather station for Met Éireann and a NAVTEX transmitter station.

ornithology

Malin Head is a perfect vantage point to see the autumn movements of seabirds such as gannets, shearwaters, skuas, guillemots and others on their flight southward migration.

Gallery

  • Hell hole cave.
  • Malin Head coast looking towards the north.
  • View of the rugged coast around the head.
  • Low tide over rocks at Malin Head.

See also

  • Malin till Mizen
  • Wild Atlantic Way

References 

  1. Jump up ^ “Ireland Geographic facts, figures and physical extremities”.Travel through Ireland’s history … Taken 2007-09-15.
  2. Jump up ^ “See Ireland’s most northerly point of Malin Head.” Brilliant Ireland. Archived from the original March 27, 2009.
  3. Jump up ^ “Malin Head 1981-2010 average.” Met Éireann. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  4. Jump up ^ “Absolute Maximum air temperature for each month at selected stations” (PDF). Met Éireann. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  5. Jump up ^ “absolute minimum air temperature of each month at selected stations” (PDF). Met Éireann. Retrieved May 27, 2015.

Lough Swilly

Lough Swilly (Irish: Loch Súilí , which means “Lake of Shadows” or “Lake of Eyes”) in Ireland is a glacial fjord or sea inlet lying between the western side of the Inishowen halvönoch Fanad Peninsula in County Donegal. Along with Carlingford Lough and Killary Harbour it is one of three glacial fjords in Ireland.

At the northern end of the lough are Fanad Head with its famous lighthouse and Dunaff Head. The cities situated on the lough include Buncrana on Inishowen and Rathmullan on the western side. In the southern part of the Lough lies Letterkenny.

Lough is also famous for its wildlife watching (dolphins, porpoises, sea birds, migratory geese and swans) and diving at the many shipwrecks, including the SS Laurentic was sunk by a German mine (possible torpedo), which went down with 3,211 ingots of gold, of which 3191 was recovered.

In the southern part of the lough a number of islands (Burt, Inch, Coney, Big Isle) was poldered and land recovered during the 19th century for farming and Londonderry and Lough Swilly Railway Constructed ramparts on the route from Derry to Letterkenny. These recycled countries is now regarded as one of Ireland’s premier wetlands for nature conservation and bird watching, supports over 4000sångsvan and thousands of Greenland white front, barnacles, gray lag and brent geese.

History

Steeped in the history of the lough and Grianan Ailigh ancient castle (early fortification and palace 2000-5000 BC) at its southeastern curve was recorded on Ptolemy’s map of the world. There are many early Stone Age monuments and Iron Age fortifications along its banks and a number of shell middens dating to around 7000 BC. It is most famous for being the site of the Flight of the Earls. After a failed uprising in September 1607, Hugh O’Neill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone and Rory O’Donnell, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell, the last Gaelic chiefs and defenders of the Brehon Law of Ireland at the time, sailed frånRathmullan with ninety of his followers.

During a storm December 4, 1811 in the Royal Navy 36-gun frigate HMS Apollo class Saldanha sank in Lough Swilly. There were no survivors from the estimated 253 board, and about 200 bodies washed up on shore.

Because of its natural protection and impressive depth Lough was a major naval port. In October 1798, just before the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars, a French fleet carrying Wolfe Tone of the United Irishmen, plus soldiers to assist 1798 rebellion, was captured and defeated in a naval battle at the entrance to Lough Swilly. Then Tone captured and brought ashore at Buncrana on the east side of the Swilly.

A subsequent reassessment of the threat of invasion led to the construction of a series of fortifications guarding the various approaches and landing points in the lough which was completed between 1800 and 1820. The Martello tower was built around 1804 to defend the methods of Derry. The six on the lough costing € 1,800 each, were armed with smooth cannon, shoot around shots and was completed in six months. Immediately before the First World War Office improved Napoleonic fort and their armor and add another fort at the entrance to the lake on Lenan Head with 9 inch guns (12-mil intervals) – the largest in Ireland at the time. The remains of these fortifications can still be inspected at Lenan Head, Fort Dunree (now a military museum and wildlife), Ned Point, Buncrana, Inch Island and on the west coast of Rathmullan, Knockalla and Macamish Point.

During World War I, was lough used by the Royal Navy as an anchor for the parts of the Grand Fleet, a merger of prewar Home and Atlantic fleets under Admiral Sir John R. Jellicoe and collection / staging point for Atlantic convoys. During this period, a boom was placed across the lough between Macamish Point and Ned’s Point, with the support of a number of trawlers, to prevent U-Boat attacks. After the Irish War of Independence lough was also one of the Treaty Ports specified in the Anglo-Irish Treaty until the final surrender at Fort Dunree 1938th

According exhibits at Fort Dunree, during World War II Irish troops manned the guns there with explicit instructions to shoot at a ship that may threaten Irish neutrality by entering the natural harbor. There was reportedly only one serious incident, when a Royal Navy ship in the lough and not initially respond to the signals that it will turn back. However, turned the ship before the Irish forces shot at it.

Seen from space: Derry and Donegal Coast, Lough Swilly to the west ochLough Foyle and the Inishowen north of the city

See also

  • List of Loughs in Ireland
  • Londonderry and Lough Swilly Railway

Lough Foyle

Lough Foyle , sometimes Loch Foyle [1] (from Irish: Loch Feabhail , which means “Feabhal’s loch” [2] [3] ), is the mouth of the River Foyle. It lies between County Londonderry iNordirland and County Donegal in Ireland. Sovereignty over these waters has been disputed since the partition of Ireland.

Seen from space: Derry in the Ulster coast of Lough Swilly and Lough Foyle west to the east of the city ochInishowen.

Ramsarområde

Lough Foyle Ramsar site (wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention), is 2204.36 hectares in area, at latitude 55 05 N and longitude 24 07 01 37 W. It was designated a Ramsar on February 2, 1999. The site consists of a large shallow sea lough which includes the estuaries of the rivers Foyle, Faughan and Roe. It contains extensive areas of tidal mudflats and sand flats, salt marshes and associated brackish ditches. The site qualified under criterion 1 of the Ramsar Convention because it is a particularly good representative example of a wetland which plays a substantial hydrological, biological and ecological systems role in the natural functioning of a major river basin is located in a border location. The qualified even under the Ramsar criterion 2 because it supports a considerable number of rare, vulnerable or endangered species of plants and animals. A number of known species have been recorded for the Lough Foyle estuary and the lower parts of some of its tributary rivers. These include shad, shad, smelt and sea lamprey, which are all Irish Red List species.Important populations of Atlantic salmon migrate through the system to and from their spawning areas. [4]

The site is qualified even under the Ramsar criterion 3 as it supports a large number of wintering waterfowl including internationally important populations of whooper swans, light belliedPrutgås and bar-tailed godwit and wild bird species of national importance in an all-Ireland context, including the red-throated diver, great crested grebe, Mute Swan, Bewick’s swan, greylag , shelduck, teal, mallard, wigeon, eider ducks and red-breasted merganser. Nationally important wader species include Eurasian Oystercatcher, Eurasian golden plover, gray plover, lapwing, red knot, dunlin, curlew, redshank and greenshank. [4]

Flora and fauna

Flora

A survey of Lough Foyle was made between March 1937 and June 1939 by H. Blackler. [5] This map shows the distribution of some species of algae in the lough and a complete annotated list of algae recorded along with photographs of various locations. The list includes: cyanophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Phaeophyceae, Rhodophyceae, lichens and two species avZostera. The marine algae of Lough Foyle are also included in Morton (2003). [6]

Fauna

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds has a reserve on Lough. [7]

Transport

In 1792, the four mil Strabane Canal was constructed from the tidal waters of Lough Foyle at Leck, to Strabane. The canal fell into disuse in 1962. In June 2006 the Strabane Lifford Development Commission awarded a £ 1.3m cross-border waterways restoration contract. The project includes restoration of one and a half miles from the canal and two locks to working order. Work began on the Lough Foyle side of the canal in the summer of 2006, but in 2010 the partial restoration was considered unsatisfactory and the municipality refused to continue to maintain the channel. The Broharris canal was built in the 1820s, when an average, about two miles long on the south shore of Lough Foyle near Ballykelly was made towards Limavady. It served both as a drainage channel and a navigation with goods brought from Londonderry Port, seafood and kelp from the sand banks along the beach.

In the summer, operates a ferry service between Green and Magilligan of Lough Foyle.

railway trip

Northern Ireland Railways runs from Londonderry train station along the scenic shores of Lough Foyle, with views of the Inishowen in County Donegal and the Atlantic Ocean via Coleraine to Belfast Central and Great Victoria Street .The strategic Belfast-Derry railway line is to be upgraded to facilitate more frequent trains and improvement of permanent way track and signaling to allow faster services.

From Londonderry railway station, the next stop is Bella Clean followed by Castle then Coleraine on his way to Belfast. Walkers access to the trains arrive at the Castle can go to Mussenden Temple is owned by the National Trust and can see the mouth of Lough Foyle and Green a bit away in County Donegal.

Literature

The main character of Alfred Bester’s famous science fiction novel, The Stars My Destination , named Gulliver Foyle. Bester took the names of their characters from different places in Ireland and the UK.

World War I

The United States Navy established a Naval Air Station, July 1, 1918 to operate seaplanes during the First World War. The base was closed shortly after the first armistice in Compiegne. [8]

WWII

At the end of World War II after the Allied victory, the rest of the Atlantic fleet of German U-boats used to attack supply lines from America to Britain during the Battle of the Atlantic gathered in Lough Foyle ochsank, as part of Operation Dead.

Controversial status

Lough Foyle is a disputed territory between Ireland and the United Kingdom after the Irish division in 1922 both sides claimed it was in its own territory.Although this dispute is still ongoing, there are currently no negotiations regarding its ownership. The State Department stressed its view June 2, 2009 that all the Lough Foyle is located in the UK, a spokesman states; “The British position is that the entire Lough Foyle is in the UK. We recognize that the Irish Government does not accept this position … There are no negotiations currently underway on this issue. The regulation of activities in the Lough is now responsible for the Loughs Agency, a cross-border bodies set up under the Belfast Agreement of 1998. ” [9]

See also

  • List of Loughs in Ireland
  • List of Ramsar sites in Northern Ireland
  • Wild Atlantic Way
  • Ireland sharing

References

  1. Jump up ^ See Google Books, for example, published online.
  2. Jump up ^ Flanagan, Deirdre & Laurence, Irish place names , page 212. Gill & MacMillan, 2002. ISBN 0-7171-3396-6
  3. Jump up ^ placental NI Lough Foyle
  4. ^ Jump up to: ab “Especially and Proposed Ramsar sites in Northern Ireland” (PDF). Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved July 7, 2008.
  5. Jump up ^ Blackler, H. 1951st A study of algae Lough Foyle, Northern Ireland. Proc. R. Ir. . Acad 54B (6): 97-139
  6. Hoppa upp^Morton, O. 2003. Den marina makroalger i County Donegal, Irland .. Bull. Ir. biogeog. Soc. 27 : 3-164
  7. Jump up ^ Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
  8. Jump up ^ Van Wye, Adrian O. (1969). Naval Aviation in World War I, Washington, DC. Chief of Naval Operations. pp. 80th
  9. Hoppa upp^3 juni 14:08:52 BST 2009. “Londonderry Sentiniel, Foyle” loughed “i tvist – 3 juni 2009” . Londonderrysentinel.co.uk . Hämtad 4 april 2011 .

The Cathedral of St. Eunan and St. Columba

St. Eunan’s Cathedral or the Cathedral of St. Eunan and St. Columbaas it is also called, is a Roman Catholic cathedral located in the parish Conwal and Leck in Letterkenny, County Donegal, Ireland. It was built between the years 1890 and 1900 and is the only Catholic cathedral in the county, but an older Church of Ireland cathedral of the same name located in the town of Raphoe.

The cathedral was commissioned in late Cardinal O’Donnell, then Bishop of Raphoe, who in 1888 aged 32 became the youngest bishop in the world at that time. [1] The cathedral, located on Castle Street opposite Conwal Parish Church in the city celebrated its centennial in 2001. Parish priests is Fr.Eamonn Kelly (Administrator), father Eamonn McLaughlin & Father Philip Kemmy (Curates). [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]

Description

The cathedral was opened June 16, 1901, and is built in the Victorian Gothic Revival style in a place with views of the city. It was designed by William Hague, the well known Dublin architect and protégé of Pugin and after the Hague death of his partner TF McNamara. [8] . Saint Eunan Cathedral has a spiramed a height of 240 feet. White sandstone from Mount Charles was used in the construction. It was broadcast along the coast and up Swilly.Townspeople by bucketloads of sandstone to the building site in parts. The cathedral is decorated in oak, with a marble pulpit from Pearse Brothers in Dublin. Pulpit shows statues of the four Masters ochfyra evangelist.

The ceilings are works of Amici in Rome, while glass windows illuminating the sanctuary and Lady Chapel is of the firm Mayer Munich. They depict the thirteen scenes of our Lord’s life. Celtic motifs and stained glass designed by Harry Clarke and Michael Healy. The large arch illustrating the life of St.Eunan (better known as St. Adhamhnáin) and St. Columba. The sanctuary lamp is made of solid silver and weighs over 1500 ounces. Some sculptures created by William Pearse who participated in the Easter Rising. [9]

There are 12 bells in the cathedral bell chamber. They bear the names of the saints Tir Conail – Dallan, Conal and Fiacre, Adomnán, Baithen and Barron, Nelis and Mura, Fionán and Davog, Cartha and Caitriona, Taobhóg, Crona and Ríanach, Ernan and Asica and Columba. The 12th bell weighs over two tons 5 CWTS. After the cathedral was opened organist played “O’Donnell Abu” , “St. Patrick’s Day” , “The Last Rose of Summer” , “wearing of the green”and “The Bells of Shandon” . [10]

The cathedral was renovated and refurbished in 1985. Measures were taken to preserve the style and materials of the original altar in the new altar table and chair. The original altarpiece, an Irish carving of Leonardo’s Last Supper, is still present in the cathedral and has been incorporated into the new altar.

Sandstone outside of the cathedral were cleaned in July 2001. The stone then repaired and pointed with a special mortar of lime and sand. Krystol HYDROSTOP finally applied to the outside. [11]

The first five pews in the cathedral always remain empty. The cause is unknown, but many believe it is the result of an old, unwritten Celtic tradition, its origin buried in the mists of the past. [12]

Adoration Chapel

The sacrament chapel worship or Adoration Chapel, as it is more commonly known positioned because of Loreto Convent. It was officially opened on December 4, 1988 by the Bishop of Raphoe, Séamus Hegarty. This one-room chapel is a restored building based on the site of an old school set up by the Loreto Sisters. It is not definitely known when the original building was erected – but during reconstruction work in 1988, was a slate wearing a Stenhuggarmärke from 1850 was discovered. The chapel granite altar designed by Barry Feely from County Roscommon, is situated in front of a stained glass window depicting “The Virgin of the sign” icon. [13]

Gallery

  • The gangway in the Cathedral
  • Cathedral pulpit
  • Stained glass windows in the cathedral
  • St. Eunan Cathedral Grounds
  • flying buttress
  • Carving of the cathedral wall

References

  1. Jump up ^ Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, Ireland
  2. Jump up ^ http://raphoediocese.ie/news-events
  3. Jump up ^ http://raphoediocese.ie/component/diocesandatabase/?task=parish&cid=1
  4. Jump up ^ http://www.donegalnow.com/article/4346
  5. Jump up ^ http://raphoediocese.ie/news-events
  6. Jump up ^ http://www.raphoediocese.ie/news-events/1-news/288-diocesan-appointments-2015
  7. Jump up ^http://www.raphoediocese.ie/component/diocesandatabase/?task=parish&cid=1
  8. Jump up ^ Gerry Convery. “Poetry in Stone: Sacred Heart Church.” (Omagh Drumragh RC Parish, 1999), p.8.
  9. Jump up ^ Sculptures by William Pearse
  10. Jump up ^ The Cathedral Bell Chamer . Published in the 1990 edition of The Letter and the district’s Christmas Annual, p.117
  11. Jump up ^ St. Eunan Cathedral – Solution
  12. Jump up ^ Catholic Reporter – In search St.Eunan; Mysteriously, no one sitting in the first five pews
  13. Jump up ^ Adoration Chapel . Published in the 1990 edition of The Letter and the district’s Christmas Annual, p.100

Letter

  • Falcarragh – 39.7 km
  • Glenties – 44 km
  • Gweedore – 46.4 km
  • Killybegs (via Donegal Town) – 75.7 km
  • Lifford – 25.4 km
  • Milford – 19.9 km
  • Lurgybrack – 2 km

History

Further information: Battle of Farsetmore and battle Scarrifholis

The modern town of Letterkenny began as a market town at the beginning of the 17th century, during the Plantation of Ulster. It may have formed on the site of a previous Gaelic settlement. It was the first border crossing in the River Swilly. In the recent past, Letterkenny was a largely agricultural town, surrounded by large cattle and sheep grazing on former untilled slope – at a time when Conwal (3 km west of the letter) was the ecclesiastical center and port. The water in the Atlantic had not yet withdrawn from the basin of the Swilly, the mouth of which at the time extended up almost as far as New Mills – evidence of this can be found in the alluvial flat land between Oldtown and Port Road.

Rory O’Cannon, the last governor of O’Cannon Clan, was killed in 1248. Godfrey O’Donnell succeeded Rory O’Cannon as King of Tír Conaill. He engaged Norman lord Maurice FitzGerald, 2 Lord of Offaly, in the battle of Credan in the north in what is now County Sligo in 1257 where both were badly damaged – Fitzgerald immediately fatally so. Godfrey (also dies of his wounds) retreated to a Crannog on Lough Beag (Gartan Lake). O’Neill of Tyrone – take advantage of Godfrey’s fatal illness – demanded submission, hostages and promises from Cenél Conaill because they had no strong chieftain then hurt by Godfrey. Godfrey summoned his forces and led them himself, even though he had to be carried on a litter (stretcher). O’Neill and his men were completely defeated by the Swilly in 1258. Godfrey died, however, after the battle near the town of Letterkenny, where is today. He was buried in the cemetery Conwal. A flat cross-shaped coffin marks his grave today.

Weakening of the waters of the Atlantic eastwards enabled progress, and with the construction of bridges, etc., the city began Letter to the form it has today. In the wake of the Plantation of Ulster (which began around 1609), when the 1:04 square kilometers (990 acres) area granted to a Scotsman Patrick Crawford, the compact community was formed.

The honor of formally launching the town fell to Sir George Marbury married Patrick Crawford’s widow – Crawford died suddenly during a return visit to his native Scotland. Initially, there were maybe fifty simple dwellings located where the Oldtown is today.

The main streets, but now suffer from congestion, was simple pony trails used by mountain farmers to reach markets. The market – started by Patrick Crawford with only a few animals – grew much livelier mart which does not exist today.

An ancient castle once stood near where the Cathedral of St. Eunan and St.Columba stands today. Letter Castle, built in 1625, was located south of Mt South on Castle Street. Outlaw Redmond O ‘Hanlon found refuge there in 1690. No remains of the castle are today. [6]

During the Irish uprising in 1798, October 12, a large French force consisting of 3000 men, and Wolfe Tone, tried to land in County Donegal, close to Lough Swilly. They were stopped by a large British Royal Navy force, and finally surrendered after a three-hour battle without ever landing in Ireland.After Wolfe Tone was captured, he was held for a short time on Laird’s Hotel (opposite the square) in the main street of Letterkenny [7] before transferring to the nearby Derry Gaol. He was later tried by the war in Dublin and found guilty. He committed suicide in prison.

1824, when the first description of Letterkenny as a modern city was written it was noted that: “Within a half mil is the port of Ballyraine, where ships of 100 tons take iron, salt and groceries and from where they export hides and butter” . Nothing now remains except the stock with examples of 19th century warehouse architecture. [8]

Letterkenny achieved town status in the early 1920s after the partition of Ireland. When the Irish punt replaced the British pound in County Donegal in 1928, many Irish banks that had previously been located in Derry (in the new Northern Ireland), opened offices in Letterkenny.

Letter made history in August 2012 when the two winning Lotto ticket with the same numbers for the same drawing was purchased at two different locations in the city – Mac Mace on the High Road and The Paper Post on Main Street. The presence made national news. A spokesman for Lotto headquarters in Dublin said it was the first time this had happened. [9]

Demography

The population of Letterkenny and environs is 19,588 (based on the 2011 census conducted by the CSO). [1]

Letterkenny is the largest town in County Donegal. Despite a long tradition of emigration that continued until the early 1990s, the letter recently had net immigration. The new immigrants are mostly of foreign origin, with many immigrants from Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. This is reflected in the recent growth of the immigrant restaurants and shops, including Chinese and Indian restaurants, as well as specialized shops run by and provide goods for Africans, Asians, South Americans and Eastern Europeans. Letter is home to the only Hindu temple in Ireland. [5] [10]

The figures for ethnic and cultural background of the people in the state in 2006 shows that 16% of Letterkenny’s population are foreign nationals. The figures also show that most of Donegal non-national population living in the city. Of the city’s total population in 2709 are foreign nationals. [11] According to the 2006 census, 4,957 people have disabilities disease, 640 people have registered disabilities, 537 have a chronic disease, while 345 are suffering from a psychological or emotional state. [12] The 2006 census showed also that there were 199 passengers living in cities surrounding. [13]

Climate

Climate data for Letter registered at Malin Head in the northernmost tip of the county. Malin Head climate is classified as Tempe Oceanic (Köppen Cfb ) and is much milder than some other places in the world on a similar latitude, this depends on the stations located near the Atlantic coast and exposure to the heat of the Gulf Stream. Because of its northern latitude, Malin Head experiencing long summer days and short winter days. Summers are cool, with temperatures rarely exceed 25 ° C (77 ° F), while winters are relatively mild with daytime temperatures rarely drop below 0 ° C (32 ° F). Extreme heat is very rare, but the city can sometimes get extreme cold of the Arctic, where temperatures drop several degrees below 0 ° C (32 ° F). Snow is relatively uncommon and the station receives an average of 20 days recorded snowfall per year, the vast majority of these occur between December and March. Humidity is high year round and rainfall is spread fairly evenly throughout the year, with the winter months get the most rainy days, but the letter may have four seasons in a day, rain, snow, sunshine, hail.

Policy

Local

Letterkenny Town Council oversaw the affairs of the city until the city council abolished in the country in 2014. [14] [15] It is now Newsletter municipality, which returns ten inhabitants tillDonegal County Council.Currently, there are four independent, three members of Fianna Fail, two members of Sinn Fein and from Fine Gael. [16]

In 2008 Letter represented Ireland in the Entente Florale, has scooped gold in the metropolitan Centre category of the 2007 National Tidy Town Awards.Locally there was a small commotion all the flags of competing nations displayed in prominent areas of the city, with some difficulty in the locals discovered the controversial Union Jack flag hanging from a pole next to the library and Paddy Delap’s newsagent. The flag is still upsetting to many people angered by continuing British rule iNordirland and as such has led to an intense heated debate on local radio station Highland Radio [17] [18] the day the judges were in town. The flag was first mounted the previous day (7 August) and had to be taken down after some concerns about their safety on a busy Thursday night. The re-assembled following day. Still, the city won the gold medal in the competition. [19]

National

Until the 2016 general election, letter was part of Donegal North East constituency. From 2016, it is part of the nationwide five-seat constituency of Donegal. In the 2016 general election, the constituency back Charlie McConalogue (Fianna Fáil), Pearse Doherty (Sinn Féin), Pat the Cope Gallagher (Fianna Fáil), Joe McHugh (Fine Gael) and Thomas Pringle (Independent).

Architecture

Main article: Architecture Letter

See also: Public art in Letterkenny

Many of Letterkenny’s more notable buildings built in the early 1850s or before. These include educational and ecclesiastical buildings. The city’s tallest building ärkatedralen St Eunan and St Columba, which was completed in 1901. The cathedral was designed by William Hague from County Cavan. It is built in a light Victorian neo-Gothic version of the French 13th century Gothic style. Located opposite the Cathedral, at the junction of Church Street with the cathedral, is Conwal Parish Church, parts of which date from the 17th century.

Another dominant building in the town is the historic Saint Eunan college.Saint Eunan’s is a three-story castelated structure with four round towers at each corner of the building. It was constructed in the Edwardian version of the neo Hiberno-Roman style. Other architecturally remarkable buildings can be found at Mount South Terrace, perched on the Market Square, next to Castle Street. This Georgian style terrace of red brick built in 1837 by Lord Southwest. The terrace includes five of the most distinctive examples of Georgian house in Letterkenny and also served as homes by Maud Gonne, who lived here on holiday in Donegal. [20] St. Conal psychiatric hospital is a large Victorian neo-Georgian structure situated påKilmacrennan Road in the city. One of the most notable buildings in West Ulster, the oldest parts are from the 1860s. The hospital’s chapel was built in neo-Norman style in the 1930s.

The Donegal County Museum is housed in the old workhouse and is located on the High Road. It was built in 1843 in neo-Tudor style typical for this type of building.

In recent years, Letter seen more unusual architectural development. The new Letterkenny Town Council offices, known locally as “The Grass House” was constructed by Donegal baseradeMacGabhann Architects. One of the most notable features is its distinctive sloping grass roof situated above a wide band of Aluka carpet lining but it is also notable for its path-like ramp to the first floor hallway. It is said to be a building of international interest.[21]

Media and art

Theater

There is a large cinema complex in the city. Located on Canal Street, Century Cinemas [22] is an eight-cinema. An Grianan Theatre, [23] the largest theater in County Donegal with a capacity of 383. There is Letterkenny Arts Centre and recent additions to the arts infrastructure include modern additions to the Letter Library and Arts Centre and Gallery Cristeph.Letterkenny Regional Cultural Centre, located behind a Grianan Theatre, opened on 9 July 2007. The city has an active music scene. [ Citation needed ]

festivals

The city has recently hosted the annual Irish music festival, Fleadh Cheoil two consecutive years. Both festivals were organized by Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann. The city also hosts the International Pan Celtic Festival for two consecutive years (2006 and 2007). Celts from Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Isle of Man, Brittany and Cornwall visited the Letter of ‘craic agus ceoil “. Along with the daily street performances on the square, An Grianan Theatre and The Courtyard Shopping Centre, vocals, violin, harp and dance competitions also featured.

Social

The town is a popular nightlife spot for local catchment and, indeed, for the rest of Ulster – especially on weekends and especially for visitors from nearby Derry. The Main Street, originally the retail center of the city, has become a center for popular nightclubs and pubs, boosted by the remnants of the old shopping district. There are several nightclubs in the area, including Milan Nightclub often hosts international tours and DJs and Pulse which offers live bands regularly. The Grill Music Venue is a popular nightclub on Sundays, which regularly hosts acts as Shane MacGowan, Ash, Hot Chip, Dirty Sanchez, Fun Lovin ‘Criminals. [24] Club Voodoo is a highly regarded [25] bar and night -Club Lower Main Street and has attracted figures such as Sander van Doorn, Markus Schulz, Paul van Dyk, Eddie Halliwell and Marco V in recent years. There are many pubs like The Central Bar (established in 1808), The Cavern, Sara’s sister, Josie’s Bar, McGinley and The Cottage Bar.

Events

Annual events include:

  • Patrick’s Parade (March)
  • Northwest 10K (May)
  • St. Eunans College 5k (May / April)
  • Donegal International Rally (June)
  • Earagail Arts Festival (June / July)
  • Donegal Harvest Rally (October)

Media

Letter can receive all national radio stations, TV stations and cable and satellite services. The area can also get many stations in Northern Ireland, including C9TV, a local television station based in Derry. The National RTÉ has a studio located in Ballyraine district.

The regional radio station Highland Radio broadcasting from the city to the north, east and west County Donegal, West Tyrone and Derry City. It began broadcasting in 1990.

Letterkenny is home to several media companies. The main regional newspaper in the city and county is the Donegal Democrat (owned by the Derry Journal ), whose office also writes two other titles every week – theDonegal People’s Press on Tuesday and also Donegal on Sunday . Another local paper, The People Derry Donegal News (popularly known locally as The Derry People ). It is distributed on a Friday and a Monday edition. The Milford based Tirconaill Tribune , printed in Letter is distributed throughout the county. The city also produces two complimentary magazine papers, Letter People (formerly Letter Listener ), which is distributed on a Thursday and theLetter Post ., Who writes on a Thursday night for Friday circulation in Derry Journal based in Derry itself is also a major newspaper in the city and its surroundings .

Crime

There were a total of 777 public order offenses recorded in the city in 2003 with 1 505 in 2008. These statistics place the letter as the sixth worst city in Ireland for public order offenses. [26]

During the past few years have seen serious violations of the letter is linked with feuds between gangs passing in some areas of the city. In one such incident, a man was seriously injured when attacked with pitchforks and slash hooks at a gas station where passes the bunch happened to meet each other. [27] , the Oldtown area has seen several feuds in recent years – dubbed“Battle of the Oldtown” of Media. In one incident, a man was stabbed and another was taken to hospital. The gangs used the ninja-type weapons chains and swords. They calmed down only on the intervention of a local priest. [28] daggers, knives, chains and rapier-type sword later confiscated by gardai. [29]

The Main Street has seen many abuses, [30] stabbings, [31] [32] [33] [34] sexual assault, [35] [36] drug raids [37] and attacks on the Gardai [38] in the past. Letter In recent years, local organizations, ranging from local to local businesses, all have set about dealing with social issues.

Economy

Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce and Industry was founded in 1965. It is the only Donegal Chamber connected to the Chambers Ireland, which means that it “provides grants to national and regional lobbying policy,” according to its website. [39]

Retail

Upper Main Street, lit up at night and crowded with people. Cross View House can be seen in the background. Several clubs, such as Milan, pulse and Grill Music Venue, located close to this area.

Retail Letter contains modern shopping centers and family owned local shops – often giving craft.

Many high street stores operating in Letterkenny. The city is the north-western regions of large shopping centers [40] , and helping to serve outlying areas including rural County Donegal and Derry. The three main shopping malls Courtyard Shopping Centre, Forte Shopping Centre and Letterkenny Shopping Centre , which is the oldest. Built in 1984, is the largest shopping center in County Donegal, [41] and was the first of several such complexes in Letterkenny. It is also the third largest in Harcourt Developments retail portfolio. While originally built on the outskirts of the city means urbanization is now located in the city proper. Letter has been identified as one of Europe’s fastest growing cities with business owners. [42] In mid largely unchanged until 2004, when the center was expanded [43] and new lighting, flooring and furnishings were added. More retail units were constructed along with the expansion of Tesco outlet and thus become “one of the major developments in Ireland”. [44] The carpark was extended to allow for a capacity of 750. The entire project is supervised by Burke Morrison engineering company. [45] These centers have a large number of international and Irish chains such as Marks & Spencer, Tesco, Eason and others. There are also many other small centers such as Glencar mall and Market Centre .

Previous Main Street was the main shopping area of the city, but the trade has moved further expanding the city in the process. Main Street is home to many older facilities including R. Mccullagh Jewellers, [46] dating back to 1869, and Speer’s department store. Newer shopping areas in the city include Letterkenny Retail Park on Pearse Street and Canal Lane . Smaller streets likeChurch Street and Castle Street has increased in recent years with companies such as bakeries, pharmacies and fashion stores have opened. The squarehas also attracted fresh business.

Industry

The city’s largest employers include General Hospital (which grew from St. Conal psychiatric hospitals), Pramerica, and the Department of Social and Family Affairs, the latter is decentralized to the city in 1990, as a result of a government decision to move 200 jobs in the service sector civilians from Dublin. Letterkenny General Hospital is now called Letter University Hospital.

Traffic jams on the High Road Letterkenny

Letter is the center of industry in the North West of Ireland. Eircom, Boston Scientific and UnitedHealth Group is a major employer in the region. As the main commercial center in north Donegal, Letterkenny is also a variety of financial services institutions, law firms and small businesses.

Pramerica is a business and technology operations subsidiary of US-based Prudential Financial Inc .. (NYSE: Pru), located in Letterkenny, County Donegal and has over 1,100 employees, Microsoft Ventures backed local software startup, Farmflo, based on the Letterkenny Institute of Technology.With Microsoft’s investment, the company hopes to create 60 new jobs in the city over the next three years. [47]

There has been a significant decline in the manufacturing base, while employment has increased in the services sector. Since 2002, there has been a significant expansion in the retail sector. Allied to this growth has been the development of the cultural infrastructure. This includes the opening of An Grianan Theatre and the development of a new arts center.

Letter was also home to confectionery manufacturers Oatfield. It was based at the entrance to Ballyraine, near the city’s downtown area. The factory was demolished in summer 2014. Rock Hill barracks was once a major contributor to the local economy, but was closed in January 2009 due to military downsizing. [48] Modern wooden house, a log house manufacturing company located in Bonagee.Den Rambling Man destillery was located Eastend to 1976, and was not named after its owner Stephen Rambling. [49]

Construction work in a private hospital, which is to provide radiotherapy services to the northwestern region, began in June 2008. Construction of the first independent hospitals in the county will cost 70 million €. The hospital will provide four surgical theaters, renal dialysis and MRI and PET scan. The 1100 m 2 (11,840 sq m) Wyndale clinic was due to be completed in 2009. [50]

The economy of the town is heavily dependent on cross-border trade, and boom periods is primarily determined by the currency exchange rate between the euro and the British pound.

Training

The Letterkenny Institute of Technology [51] (LYIT, known locally as the regional and IT ), located east of the center of Port Road, is a center for technology, information technology, materials science, design, business and nursing humanities. The Institute has a student population of 3,000 and is one of the largest institute for postgraduate studies anywhere iUlster, which offers a range of degrees to master level.

Saint Eunan College is a large secondary school center in Letterkenny.Located just northwest of downtown, was built in 1906.

Primary and secondary education in the city is organized in the same way as the rest of Ireland. There are five primary schools in Letterkenny, including Scoil Colmcille and Woodland School, while there are four high schools. [52]

Coláiste Ailigh is a gaelcoláiste Letter. There is a secondary school designed specifically for education through Irish. It was opened in 2000.

The Loreto Convent Secondary School, adjacent to St. Eunan’s Cathedral, is over 150 years old.

Sports

See also: List of people Letter – Sports

Letter has a modern community purpose-built leisure complex, consisting of a swimming pool, soccer fields (both natural grass and astroturf), and gymnasiums. Gaelic football, rugby and football are the most popular sports in the city, but many other minority sports are also exercised, such as hurling, boxing, karate, kick-boxing, handball, bowling, golf, swimming and gymnastics.

Association football

A view of the skyline Letter

Letterkenny Rovers are one of the most famous football clubs in the city.The team plays its home games at Leckview Park, on Canal Road in the city.Bonagee United are another local teams and play their home games at the Dry Arch Park and Glencar Celtic FC is a different team from the town who plays in Donegal League and the recent winners of the Saturday League Cup.There are a number of school soccer clubs in the city surroundings and an annual league played on the under 12, under 14 and under 16 age groups.

Current Arthurlie FC professional soccer player Denis McLaughlin born from Letterkenny.

Gaelic football

Letter has two GAA clubs: Naomh Adhamhnáin and Letter Gaels, who play their home games at O’Donnell Park, and Pairc na nGael in The Glebe, respectively. Almost uniquely in Ireland, Letterkenny Gaels, GAA club, sharing facilities with, Letterkenny Rugby Club. Gaelic football, like most of County Donegal, is the dominant sport, although the English variety is also very popular.

Rugby

Rugby is also popular in the city, played on different levels, from school to higher league level. Letter RFC, founded in 1973, is the biggest rugby club in the city. Recently it has forged links with New Zealand rugby student because of the fact that Dave Gallaher, the first captain of all black, born in Ramelton, a village eight miles (13 km) from the paper. The club rugby ground in Letterkenny named Dave Gallaher Memorial Park in his honor in November 2005 by a visiting contingent of all black players, led by captain Tana Umaga.

Other sports

Letter has two men’s basketball team, Letter Heat and Letterkenny IT, as well as a junior basketball club, Letter Blaze. [53] Letterkenny Golf Club is located just outside the city center. There are also pitch and putt and tennis in town.Letter Sports Complex, a modern leisure center complete with skate park, located on the outskirts of the city. Letterkenny Athletic Club is also located in the city. The city is also host to Donegal International Rally, the third weekend of June each year ochDonegal Harvest Rally every October. It is a campaign run by a local councilor for the construction of a horse racing track and facilities on land on the Big Isle, on the outskirts of the city. [54]

In 2014 Donegal Marathon was relaunched in the city after an absence of 29 years. [ Citation needed ]

Transport

Letter Infrastructure Hub & Midlands Gateway access

Air

The nearest airport is the City of Derry Airport, located about 48 kilometers (30 mi) to the east at Eglinton. Donegal Airport (locally known as Carrickfinn Airport) is less than an hour away, is west of the Rosses.

Letter is a small privately run airfield on the outskirts of the city that is in operation; it has both hard and grass of 620 meters, hangars available for overnight guests, ICAO Eilt. There is also a small private airfield at Finn Valley about 8 miles away. It is run and operated by Finn Valley Flying Club.The runway is 700 meters grass; It is primarily for the use of ultralight aircraft and light aircraft. The airfield is home to a lot of ultralight aircraft and flying club run a large open weekend every August where many aircraft are flying in to participate in den.Flygfältet is only suitable for small private aircraft and ultralight aircraft, and there is no commercial traffic anywhere where ; It is sometimes used by businessmen to land their small plane, and that is about 8 miles from the city.

Rail

See also: History of Irish railways

The city was once, in connection with the once extensive narrow gauge rail County Donegal. This gave connections to Derry (and through it to Dublin and Belfast), Lifford and Strabane, to Gweedore and Burton and Carndonagh, north of Derry. The railway system was built in the late 19th century, with the recent addition opens in the 20th century. Some of these lines were never profitable, built by the then British government subsidies. Just a few decades later, the independent Irish Free State from the rest of the UK resulted in railway companies operating across two countries where previously been.This had devastating effects on an already fragile economic situation, which ultimately results in the definitive cessation of all parts of the railway system in the area of in 1960.

Today, the nearest railway station to County Donegal is Londonderry train station in the nearby town of Derry. The station is owned and operated by Northern Ireland Railways (NIR) and runs through Coleraine to Belfast Central Station and Belfast Great Victoria Street Railway Station. The strategic Belfast-Londonderry railway line is to be upgraded to facilitate more frequent trains and improvements of the permanent way track and signaling to allow faster services. NI Railways (TRANSLINK) [55]

Road

Letter is well served by road traffic. Bus Eireann runs several daily services from the bus depot to Ireland’s major urban centers such as Dublin (number 32), Derry and Galway (both # 64). Private bus companies operate daily flights to and from the city. The Lough Swilly Bus Company (popularly known locally as Lough Swilly and the Swilly Bus ) operated a local transport service until they ceased operations in April 2014. Bus Eireann is now the main bus provider in the city. Currently, the availability of Dublin improving motorway status of roads built along the road, so cars to complete the Dublin Letter trip in about 3 hours and 30 minutes. Galway, in the south, is 4 hours away by car, while the Belfast, to the southeast, is 2 hours away by car.

Private companies provide daily bus service to Belfast. Letter has no cross-connection between the right to Belfast.

Taxi services are available from a rank on Main St. the Market Square.

Two national primary roads serve the city: the N13 from the south (Stranorlar) and N14 from the East (Lifford). N13 also has links to the A2 road (Northern Ireland) to Derry. The N56 county road, beginning at N14 in the city, traveling in a loop around the county, which ended in Donegal town.Regional roads include R245, which connects Letter north to Fanad and Rosguill peninsulas, and R250 southwest of Glenties.

Community

Cathedral grounds Letter

See also: List of people and Letter List of Donegal people

Jean Glover died on Letter 1,801th

Letterkenny Community Centre on Pearse Road runs regularly carboot sales on Saturdays. [56]

tidy Towns

Letterkenny has a long history of the Irish National Tidy Towns Competition, first recorded in 1959 and did his best results in 2015. [57]

In 2002, a National Anti-Litter League survey conducted by a Taisce compared Letter excess litter normally associated with the liberties, a litter black spot which is located in Dublin’s poor inner city. [58] It was voted “Best Kept Urban Centre” in 2007 “best kept Town Awards [ citation needed ] and took first prize in the category” Large Urban Centre “at the 2007 Tidy Towns competition. It seemed to keep her brood status for the rest of this decade, judging by the results of a study by business group Irish Business against Litter, published August 23, 2010. [59]

In 2011 it was named as his county’s tidiest town, receiving 306 points, four less than the overall winner Killarney. This included 47/50 points for its landscaping, the highest score of any city in this category. Of the 821 participants in the contest in 2011, ended Letter in eighth place and received a gold medal for the ninth consecutive year. In the 2012 contest, was chosen as the tidiest town in the northwestern part of the country. [60] In 2013, it was chosen as one of Ireland’s top ten cities. [61]

In 2015, letter achieved its best results in the Tidy Towns competition, awarded first prize in the category “Large Urban Centre” and receive the total price as Ireland’s tidiest, Ireland’s best. [62] [63] [64]

twins

The following sites are twinned with Letter:

  • Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, USA [65]
  • Derry, Northern Ireland

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland
  • List of sites for the All Ireland Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann (2005, 2006)
  • Market Houses in Ireland

footnotes

  1. ^ Jump up to: abc “Census 2011 Results – Profile a city and country – population distribution and movements and population by Area” (PDF).Central Statistics Office Census 2011 reports. Central Statistics Office of Ireland. April 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2012.
  2. Jump up ^ “First County Title”. Naomh Adhamhnáin. Archived from originaletden April 12, 2015.
  3. Jump up ^ “Confidence boost for the Cathedral Town”. Donegal News. 24 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  4. Jump up ^ Draft Letter Plan 2009 – 2015 Volume 1 – The 75th
  5. ^ Jump up to: ab “From wooden to God’s house”. Irish Independent.Independent News & Media. 21 August 2007. Retrieved 21 August of 2007.
  6. Jump up ^ Donegal News – 18 April 2007.
  7. Jump up ^ “Wolf Tone Trapped in the Letter”. Aohdiv1.org.
  8. Jump up ^ Only Warehouse architecture remains
  9. Jump up ^ Harkin, Greg (13 July 2012). “It could be you .. and also, Letter scoops two Lotto wins”. Irish Independent. Independent News & Media .Hämtad 13 August 2012.
  10. Jump up ^ “Letter Indian Community Centre”.
  11. Jump up ^ Donegal Democrat report, July 31, 2007
  12. Jump up ^ Donegal News report, 9 November 2007
  13. Jump up ^ Census 2006 – Irish Travellers
  14. Jump up ^ “Call for Letter Forums City Council meets for the last time.”Highland Radio. May 12, 2014. Archived from the original on 9 Mar, 2015.Retrieved May 12, 2014.
  15. Jump up ^ “” A dark day ‘looms for Letter to City Council stops “.Donegal Democrat. May 11, 2014. Archived from the original on 9 Mar, 2015.Retrieved 11 May 2014.
  16. Jump up ^ “Donegal County Council”. Donegalcoco.ie.
  17. Jump up ^ Highland Radio – Latest Donegal News and Sports .Highlandradio.com. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  18. Jump up ^ [1] Filed July 26, 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  19. Jump up ^ Letter wins gold in the Entente Florale Highland Radio 22 September 2008
  20. Jump up ^ Mount South, on Flickr. com (accessed May 29, 2008)
  21. Jump up ^ “In the march”, Archi Seek August 4, 2002 (accessed 29 May 2008)
  22. Jump up ^ Century Cinemas website (accessed 29 May 2008)
  23. Jump up ^ An Grianan Theatre website (accessed 29 May 2008)
  24. Jump up ^ 任意整理についての注目ホームページ« thegrillniteclub »” .Thegrillniteclub.com.
  25. Jump up ^ [2] [ dead link ]
  26. Jump up ^ Letter listed as one of the worst cities for public order offenses, Donegal News, March 16, 2009
  27. Jump up ^ “BBC NEWS – United Kingdom – Northern Ireland – police unit to investigate the” feud “”. Bbc.co.uk.
  28. Jump up ^ Priest to end the dispute, the Irish News, October 27, 2007
  29. Jump up ^ “nwipp-newspapers.com”. Nwipp-newspapers.com.
  30. Jump up ^ Gardai issue appeal to the licensed trade for serious abuses in Letterkenny, Belfast Telegraph May 22, 2007
  31. Jump up ^ Man due in court over stabbing Donegal, Irish Independent, October 17, 2008
  32. Jump up ^ Two hurt in separate assaults, Irish Independent, October 10, 2006
  33. Jump up ^ Dubliner held on stabbing and drug charges, the Irish Times, October 14, 2008
  34. Jump up ^ Horror knife attack, Donegal News, 18 September 2009
  35. Jump up ^ Gardai fear the power of sex attacks are linked, Irish Independent, 23 November 2002
  36. Jump up ^ Gardai launch search for sex attack duo, Irish Independent, February 6, 2006
  37. Jump up ^ Gardai make two cannabis seizures night, the Irish Times, September 9, 2001
  38. Jump up ^ spit Letter to the “beginning, middle and end of a blaggard” – Judge Kilrane, Donegal Democrat, 9 September 2008
  39. Jump up ^ “About”. Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce and Industry.Archived from the original September 29, 2015.
  40. Jump up ^ Letter Shopping capital of the North West
  41. Jump up ^ “Relaunch of Letterkenny Shopping Centre”. The Sunday Business Post .12 December 2004. Archived from the original on 19 February 2006. Hämtad12 February 2012.
  42. Jump up ^ “player”. fyini.com. 5 September 2005. Hämtat12 October of 2007.
  43. Jump up ^ “New look for Donegal town center.” Irish Independent. 24 November 2004. Retrieved 11 October of 2007.
  44. Jump up ^ Ireland’s Shopping Mecca
  45. Jump up ^ Burke Morrison Project
  46. Jump up ^ R. McCullagh Jewellers website (accessed 29 May 2008)
  47. Jump up ^ “London coup Farmflo”. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  48. Jump up ^ Four barracks to the military hospital closed the Irish Independent, October 15, 2008
  49. Jump up ^ Fleming, Sam (1984). Letter past and present. Donegal Democrat.
  50. Jump up ^ Letter Private Hospitals
  51. Jump up ^ Letterkenny Institute of Technology website (accessed 29 May 2008)
  52. Jump up ^ Education at Letterkenny Guide.com
  53. Jump up ^ Letter Blaze Basketball. Blazebasketball.ie. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  54. Jump up ^ “Build.com Smarter Home Improvement – HVAC, lighting, plumbing, Door Hardware & More”. Build.ie.
  55. Jump up ^ All timetables. Translink. Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  56. Jump up ^ “Fleamarket”. Letterkenny Community Centre.
  57. Jump up ^ O’Faherty, Jane (28 September 2015). “After 56 years, finally clears Letter on Tidy Towns awards.” Irish Independent. Hämtad28 September 2015.
  58. Jump up ^ “Letter as dirty as freedoms”. The Belfast Telegraph. 29 May 2002. Archived from the original September 29, 2015.
  59. Jump up ^ “Letter is Ireland’s 15 cleanest city”. ivideo.ie. In 2010.
  60. Jump up ^ “Letter excels in the 2012 Tidy Towns awards.” Highland Radio. 10 September 2012. Archived from the original on 29 September 2015. Hämtat10 September 2012. Letterkenny [sic] has retained its gold medal in 2012 […] competition, and has been named the tidiest town in the northwestern region, as well as in County Donegal.
  61. Jump up ^ “Letter hope to be crowned Ireland’s top city after being named in the top ten.” Donegal Daily. 26 November 2013. Retrieved November 26, 2013.
  62. Jump up ^ “Letter is Ireland’s tidiest town in 2015!”. Tidy towns. 28 September 2015. Archived from the original on 29 September 2015.Hämtat28 September 2015.
  63. Jump up ^ “Letter of Co Donegal named Ireland’s tidiest town.” RTÉ News.28 September 2015. Archived from the original on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 28 September 2015.
  64. Jump up ^ O’Brien, Tim (28 September 2015). “Tidy Towns: Lovely Letter buckets national top spot.” The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 28 September 2015.
  65. Jump up ^ Elizabethtown Borough’s website (accessed 29 May 2008)

Killybegs

Killybegs (Irish: Na Cealla Beaga ) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. It is the largest fishing port in the county and on the island of Ireland. It is located on the south coast of the county, north of Donegal Bay, near Donegal Town.The city lies at the head of a beautiful harbor and at the foot of a large mountainous tract that extends north. [1] In the summer, there is a street festival celebrating the fish catches and incorporating the traditional “Blessing of the Boats”. It has a population of 1297 [2]

History

1588, Killybegs was the last stop of the Spanish ship La Girona , which had cast anchor in the harbor when the Spanish armada picked up on the Irish coast during the Spanish war with England. Using a Killybegs chieftain, MacSweeney Bannagh, the Girona’s staff fed, her rudder repaired, and she set sail for Scotland, but wrecked off the Antrim coast with the loss of nearly 1,300 lives. [3]

fishing industry

Killybegs is a natural deep water harbor with a depth of 12 meters at low water spring tide on the new € 50 million pier completed in 2004. The port is home to all the major Irish floating pelagic trawlers, and a modest whitefish fleet, but it handles many other types of shipping samt.Dessa include cruise ship passengers and mixed specialist loads. In recent years, Killybegs been favored port for the importation of wind turbines, and is a service port for offshore gas drilling / rigs.

The city is the center of the Irish pelagic fishing and processing industry, which specializes in processing and freezing of species sommakrill, herring, SCAD, and blue whiting. The finished processed fish exported to markets in Africa, the Middle East and Europe freezer vessels. But because of the blanket application of EU fisheries rules on Irish vessels from the Irish Department of the Marine, beginning in 2005, and mackerel shoals longer in Norwegian waters, there has been a decline in the fishing industry in the city.This has led to redundancies in the fish processing industry, where the fish factory workers have been hardest hit.

Training

The first national school, known as “Killybegs National School” and later as “Commons National School”, which was opened in 1834 on a site originally supplied by Plantation Commissioners in the reign of King James I [4] There are three national schools and a second level school in Killybegs and a third level institution tourism College Killybegs, the only dedicated tourism Institute in Ireland, which offers courses in hospitality ochkulinariska skills.The college has been academically integrated with Letterkenny Institute of Technology since 2001. Donegal Town to Killybegs, Donegal Railway branch of the county finishes at the port and some of the remains can still be seen today. The railroad closed on the last day of 1959. ” St Catherine’s Vocational School” is a non-denominational, co-educational school second. There are twenty six teachers, five special needs assistants and three support staff. The student population is 348 and the male female student ratio to about 50:50.The existing two-storey building was opened in 1987 provides opportunities for students, teachers and members of the community. St. Catherine’s has a number of extra curricular activities, the school has had success in English, Irish and scientific debates. The art is well provided with an arts and music department, music department has staged a number of musical productions, students learn a variety of instruments. Work of art dept can be seen on killybegstech.com. Sport is also an important aspect of school students participate in teams representing the school in football, Gaelic football, athletics, basketball and rugby.

Beach

Fintra beach (registered blue flag) is located on the outskirts of Killybegs town. It consists entirely of fine golden sand, and receives a large number of day-trippers during the peak of tourist season. It is lifeguarded during the bathing season, and is considered one of the safest beaches in Ireland.

Donegal Carpets

Main article: Donegal Carpets

Killybegs is famous for its tapestries and carpets, some of which are produced on the largest carpet loom in the world “Donegal Carpet Factory”.Carpets, called Donegal , are hand-knotted in the Turkish style. The rugs have adorned many important buildings in Ireland such as Dublin Castle, the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Aras an Uachtarain, Buckingham Palace and internationally Vatican, the White House, 10 Downing Street and most government buildings around the world. The factory in Killybegs was closed in 2003 and has been open since 2006, Maritime & Heritage Centre. It provides information about carpet-making and fisheries. Tours are conducted daily and visitors can watch small rugs that are made and try and make a knot. There is also a ship simulator which is the most modern in Ireland. The simulator provides three levels of technology that provides great fun for kids and not so young to test their navigation skills. The center is open year round.

Sports

The local football club, St. Catherine FC, founded in 1896 and they play their home games at Emerald Park.

The local GAA club is Na Cealla Beaga. They play their home games The Eamon Byrne Memorial Park.

Killybegs in the literature

Killybegs Author: John C. Ward: A Teagasg Criostaidhe fa Choinne Dioghoise Ratha Bhota 1891; Turas na croiche agus a Choróin Mhuire maille le dántaibh diadha 1892; Na hEipistil agus na soisgéil do Domhnaigh agus na na laetha saoire are dtarraingt go Gaeilge 1904; Chart Cruinneolaí 1906;Leabhar filíochta fa choinne Scoil na 1909 (with Padraig O’Beirne).

Thomas Colin MacGinley (Kinnfaela): The Cliff Scenery Donegal South West1867 (reprinted by four Masters Press 2000), General Biology in 1874.

Very Reverend James Stephens, PP: Illustrated Handbook of the landscape and Antiquities in the South West Donegal 1872nd

Charles Conaghan: Vitter of Killybegs in 1975.

Dr. Donald Martin: Killybegs then and now in 1998, Killybegs Down Memory Lane 2011.

Pat Conaghan: bury 1989; The Great Famine in southwest Donegal from 1845 to 1850 in 1997. The Zulu Fishermen 2003, steamed fish (Phoenix No. 2, Winter 1991/2), Stranorlar, not San Francisco (Phoenix No. 3, Spring 1992).

Bella McGee (poet) James Conwell (poet) Padraig O’Beirne (poet) such as Mo Phiopa Gairid Donn (nd).

In 2011, French author Ensure Chalandon published “Retour à Killybegs” (Return to Killybegs “), whose main character, Tyrone Meehan a 80-year-old former IRA officer and a British agent for 20 years was born then assassinated in April 2007 at his family home Killybegs.

People

  • Kevin Sharkey, artist and musician
  • Manus Boyle, Gaelic footballer
  • Barry Cunningham, Gaelic footballer
  • Barry McGowan, Gaelic football
  • Séamus Coleman, Everton FC return
  • Brian Brady, Fianna Fáil politician
  • Noelle Vial, poet
  • Thomas Pringle Independent TD
  • Hugh McFadden, Gaelic footballer

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland

References

  1. Jump up ^ Samuel Lewis (1858), a topographical Dictionary of Ireland, p. 158, retrieved July 23, 2011
  2. Jump up ^ “travelsradiate.com”. Implement Geoname Database.Retrieved 4 July 2011.
  3. Jump up ^ “La Girona” (PDF). Annual Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck, 2005. The Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck Sites. pp. 35 pp.Retrieved 1 November 2008.
  4. Jump up ^ bury-New Horizons on the history of Killybegs Killybegs: Pat Conaghan, Aghyeevoge (1989) OCLC 22529769

Inishowen

Inishowen (Irish: Inis Eoghain , meaning “island of Eoghan”) is a peninsula in County Donegal, Ireland. It is the largest peninsula in all the island of Ireland. Inishowen is a picturesque place with a rich history. The peninsula includes Ireland’s most northerly point, Malin Head, along with Lagg sand dunes, some of the highest in Europe. The Grianan of Aileach, a ring fort that served as the royal seat of the Kingdom Ailech, stands at the entrance to the peninsula.

Towns of Inishowen

The main towns and villages in Inishowen are:

  • Ballyliffin , Buncrana , Bridgend , Burnfoot , Burt
  • Carndonagh , Carrowmenagh, Clonmany , Culdaff
  • Dunaff
  • understand
  • Glengad, Gleneely, Greencastle
  • Killea
  • Malin , Malin Head , Moville , Muff
  • Newtowncunningham
  • Redcastle
  • Quigley Point
  • Urris

Geography
After the last ice age peninsula was an island. Most of Inishowen’s population inhabit the peripheral coastal areas, while the interior consists of low mountains, mostly covered by swamps, of which the highest is the Slieve Snaght which is 619 meters (2,030 feet) above sea level. Other large hills located in the Malin Head peninsula, as well as Urris Hills in west Inishowen.Because of its geography, Inishowen usually has relatively more moderate weather conditions, with temperatures slightly lower than in other parts of Ireland in the summer and slightly warmer in the winter, especially during periods of extended cold väder.Inishowen is a peninsula of 884.33 square kilometers (218.523 acres) , located in the northernmost part of the island of Ireland. It is bordered on the north by the Atlantic Ocean, to the east by Lough Foyle, and to the west of Lough Swilly. It is joined at the south to the rest of the island and is mostly in County Donegal in Ireland. The southeastern part of the peninsula is located in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, has been transferred from Donegal on behalf of London businesses as part of the Plantation of Ulster in the early 17th century. The peninsula is separated from the rest of Northern Ireland on the River Foyle.

Inishowen has several harbors, some of which are used for commercial fishing purposes, including Greencastle, Bunagee and Leenan. A season ferry crossing Foyle connecting Green with Magilligan County Londonderry, while another cross Swilly connecting Buncrana with Rathmullan. The village of Fahan has a privately built marina.

There are several small outlying islands off the Inishowen coast, mainly Inishtrahull and Glashedy islands, both uninhabited, although the former was inhabited until the early twentieth century. Inch, located in Lough Swilly is technically no longer an island, as it has a causeway connecting it to the mainland at Tooban, south of Fahan.

Lough Swilly is a fjord-like lough, and was of strategic importance for many years to the British Empire as a deep-water port. It is also known as the starting point for the Flight of the Earls. Lough Foyle is important, as the entrance to the River Foyle and the city of Derry, but is much more shallow than Lough Swilly, and requires the use of a pilot boat to guide ships to and from Londonderry Port.

A large area of land, most of which are now part of Grianan Farm , one of the largest farms in Ireland, was reclaimed from a shallow area in Lough Swilly, which stretches from the village of Burnfoot Bridgend and Burt. The contours of this country is conspicuous because of its flatness prove a stark contrast to the more mountainous area around it.

History

Which preceded the formation of County Donegal by centuries, the area was named Inis Eoghain (island of Eoghan) after Eogan mac Neill, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages ( Niall Naoigeallach , enhögkung), whose name was also used for Tyrone (Irish: Tír Eoghain ). Inis Eoghain is also the homeland Meic Lochlainn (descended from the tribe of Eoghan), a clan that grew so formidable that they eventually came under siege by a Limerick King, who came north to Aileach, and ordered the destruction of Aileach fort and to every soldier was to remove a stone from the fort to prevent its reconstruction. Later, after the fall of Meic Lochlainn was chieftainship of Inis Eoghain usurped by the Ó Dochartaigh clan (descended from the tribe Conaill), because they lost their own homeland in the Laggan valley area Tír Conaill.

Inishowen has many historical monuments dating back to the early settlements, and including the ruins of several castles and forts on Grianan Aileach. The ancient fort of Grianan Ailigh Burt was once the seat of högkung, both the High Kings of Meic Lochlainn, who held power in Inis Eoghain for many centuries. It was restored in the nineteenth century, although some damage in recent years has resulted in the partial collapse of the southern side of the wall. Among the main castle ruins Inishowen is Carrickabraghey on the Isle of Doagh, Norman Castle at Greencastle, Inch Castle, Buncrana Castle and Elagh Castle.

In 1196, John de Courcy, an Anglo-Norman knight who had invaded Ulster in 1177, defeated the king of Cenél Conaill and most of Donegal was at his mercy. Two years later he returned to devastate Inishowen. But in subsequent campaigns they Courcy defeated by O’Neill clan headed by his manager AED Méith and found himself unable to conquer the west of Ulster.[1]

1608 Sir Cahir O’Doherty, the last Gaelic Lord Inishowen and a former ally of the crown, launched O’Doherty revolt by burning Derry. After the defeat of the uprising lot of O’Doherty former countries was awarded to Arthur Chichester.

Ireland’s fatal traffic accident happened on the Inishowen in July 2010. [2] [3] [4] [5]

demography

At the last census in Ireland in 2006, Inishowen counted a population of 31,802, an increase of 8.4% compared to 1996. [6] Buncrana is the largest city in Inishowen, with a population in 2006 of 3394 in its locality. [6]

Political

At the national level, Inishowen is a part of Donegal constituency, which selects five TDs to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (the Irish Parliament). At the county level are Inishowen an electoral district, a municipal district, the election of nine councilors to Donegal County Council. Currently there are three members of Fianna Fáil, two each Sinn Féin and Fine Gael, the Labour Party and one independent. [7]

Media

In addition to the radio stations and newspapers available elsewhere in Donegal, several media are based solely on the peninsula, including two magazines (in Inish Times and Inishowen Independent , both published in Buncrana) and an online daily local news service (InishowenNews.com ).Inishowen is also home to the only community station in the county (Inishowen Community Radio, based in Carndonagh). The traditional source of news for Inishowen is the Derry Journal , published in nearby Derry city, since 1772. It still serves the peninsula as a paper of record.

Tourism

Inishowen 100 tourist route [8] is an approximately 100 mil signposted scenic drive around the peninsula. It takes in or passes near most of the tourist attractions and places of interest on the peninsula.

It starts at Bridgend where there is a picnic area with a large map and information boards. The first part of the coastal road along the coast of Lough Swilly. It passes Inch Island, Fahan (a blue flag beach), Fahan 18-hole golf course, Buncrana Town, Tullyarvan Mill (an interpretive center tracing over 250 years of textile manufacturing in Buncrana area.). It continues along the western shore of Lough Swilly.

The routes go Dunree beach, Dunree Fort (military museum) and then turns inland for Mamore Gap (between Urris Hills and Raghtin More mountain), Leenan Bay, Dunaff head Tullagh Bay (a blue flag beach), through the villages of Clonmany and Ballyliffin. Ballyliffin has a well respected golf course with 18 holes.

After Ballyliffin route passes the Isle of Doagh (where there is a famine museum and interpretive center). Next is Carndonagh – the second largest city in Inishowen, after which the road turns north again by Malin Town (known for having won its category in Ireland’s Tidy Towns competition several times), the last five fingers Beach and then up the mountain peak point and car park at Knockamany Bens, then back down to the sea with the route looks in the open Atlantic, before heading for Banba crown a peninsula off the peninsula, it is home to Ireland’s most northerly point Malin Head.

On the northeast coast passing the village of Culdaff and Culdaff Bay (another blue flag beach), remote Tramone Bay, Kinnagoe Bay. As the coast turns east reaches of Lough Foyle and Shroove at the mouth of the Lough and then Green (the port used by fishing boats and landing point for the car ferry to and from Magilligan in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland). Then as the road south along the Lough Foyle it passes through the city of Moville, Quigley Point and Muff village where the road turns right and heads back to Bridgend where the journey began.

Sport

As in other parts of Ireland, there are a wide variety of sports organizations and activities practiced on the peninsula.

Gaelic sport

Inishowen is no exception popularity Gaelic football in the county with several clubs representing the different churches in the peninsula. Each club has many different football teams for both sexes and different age groups.While throwing played at underage level of all the clubs there are, still, put no adult teams regularly of any of them. [1]

  • Beart CLG, Burt [2]
  • Buncrana GAA club [3]
  • Carndonagh GAA club [4]
  • Malin GAA club [5]
  • Moville GAA club [6]
  • St Patrick GAA klubb, Muff [7]
  • Urris GAA club [8]

Rugby

  • Inishowen Rugby [9]

Football

  • Inishowen Football League

Other sports

  • Biking
  • Golf [10]
  • Horse riding
  • kayaking
  • Skytte – North Inishowen Gun Club [11]
  • Surfing
  • mountaineering

References

  1. Jump up ^ DeBreffny, D; Mott, G (1976). The churches and monasteries of Ireland. London: Thames & Hudson. pp. 60-61.
  2. Jump up ^ According to The Irish Times , “the National Roads Authority road safety expert Stephen Lambert said last night the death toll was the highest number of deaths in a single crash since records began in 1961”.
  3. Jump up ^ Watt, Alex (13 July 2010). “Funeral Plans for Men Killed in Crash Irish”. Sky News. BSkyB. Retrieved 13 July 2010.
  4. Jump up ^ “Funerals Donegal crash ‘. News BBC. BBC. 15 July 2010.Retrieved 15 July 2010.
  5. Jump up ^ “Eight fatal crash ‘worst on record’ ‘. Irish Independent.Independent News & Media. 12 July 2010. Retrieved 12 July 2010.
  6. ^ Jump up to: ab “Census 2006 Year-end”. Central Statistics Office of Ireland. In 2006. Taken 2010-02-06.
  7. Jump up ^ “Councillors of the Municipality Inishowen.” Donegal County Council. 14 April 2016.
  8. Jump up ^ “Inishowen 100 driving route”. Ride with GPS. 2010-07-04.Pulled 10/11/2014.

Greencastle

Green (Irish: An Caislean Nua ) is a commercial fishing harbor located in the northern part of the scenic Inishowen Peninsula on the north coast of County Donegal, Ireland on Lough Foyle .Numera, given the decline in the fishing industry, it is more like a “typical” Donegal holiday village. It is a few miles from Moville and is approximately 20 miles from Derry. Green’s name comes from the castle in the area, which in turn may have gotten its name from the green Freestone which it was built. The castle, originally built by the Anglo-Normans, is also known as Northburgh Castle.

History

The first real bridge was built in 1813 [1] and has been added to several times since. Today, as well as being a tie for trawlers and salmon boats and homes for Green Fish Co-Op, Foyle Fishermen’s Co-Op and Fresco Seafoods pier has a completely different “catch”. Visitors disembark Magilligan -Greencastle ferry which opened in 2002. [2] The official website advertises the fact that it saves 78 km (or 49 miles) run, which would be done through Derry. Lough Foyle shipping company has also recently (2004) ushered in a Lough Swilly ferry that goes mellanBuncrana and Rathmullan season. The pier also includes a newly built pilot office to replace the defunct pilot offices Carrickarory Pier.

Green is also one of the avstignings ports for cruise ships visiting Derry.Because of the tidal nature of the Foyle estuary, it is sometimes too shallow for cruise ships to get to Lisahally docks in Derry. Stop at Green also saves 5 hours sailing roundtrip. But passengers have to get through tenders, unlike Lisahally docks, the Green pier is not designed to allow a cruise ship to the dock. [3]

Castle Green has been linked with the castle in the background of Derry weapons. [4]

The castle was built in 1305 to provide a base for the Anglo-Norman power in the North West. This building was named “North Burg”. [5] There is a more modern Martello Fort beside Norman ruin. This was built by the British to stop the Napoleonic invasion circa 1800.

National Fisheries College (NFC) is located in Greenville. NFC has recently completed a € 1.1 million extension financed under INTERREG Initiative 11, which provides better facilities, including a realistic simulator bridge deck.

Marina protests

Statements that visiting boats were turned away from the port now has proved to be totally unfounded. A private company sought to establish a private marina in the public harbor, forcing local fishermen out. A rumor was announced that visiting yachts were turned into a storm; Gardai investigations found these accusations have no basis, as confirmed by the harbor master. [6] [7]

Notable people

  • Mark Farren (Derry City player)
  • William Fitzsimons Irish-born Australian politician who came from Green
  • Brian Friel, Irish dramatist who lived in Greenville from 1960 until his death in 2015.

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland
  • Bella Clean station

References

  1. Jump up ^ Sean Beattie (2004). Donegal (Ireland old photographs series). Sutton. Printing press ISBN 0-7509-3825-0.
  2. Jump up ^ Donegal Library Information
  3. Jump up ^ “Bad weather scuppers liner visits”. BBC News. 09.02.2009.Retrieved 2010-05-04.
  4. Jump up ^ British Civic Heraldry – Derry Retrieved 2007-09-29.
  5. Jump up ^ Foyle Ferries Info
  6. Jump up ^ [1]
  7. Jump up ^ Irish Times May 20, 2011

Glenveagh Castle

Glenveagh Castle (Irish: Caislean Ghleann Bheatha ) is a large crown manor house built in the Scottish Baronial style in Glenveagh National Park, near both Churchill and Gweedorei County Donegal, Ireland. The castle was built between 1870 and 1873, and consists of a four storey rectangular keep surrounded by a garden, and has a background of some 165.4 square kilometers (40.873 acres) of mountains, lakes, valleys and forests complete with a herd of red deer. The visitor center has displays explaining the park as well as an audio-visual show and available for visitors with disabilities.Gardens and castle were left to the Irish nation in 1981 by Henry Plumer McIlhenny of Philadelphia, who had bought the farm in 1937th Hollywood stars like Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Charlie Chaplin and Greta Garbo holiday at the castle while McIlhenny owned it. [1] Irish Gleann Bheatha (Bheithe) translates into English as “Glen of the Birch Trees”.

captain Adair

The castle was built by Captain John George Adair (1823 – 1885), born in Co. Leix, and a member of the minor nobility. Adair had made his fortune by chancy markspekulationi United States, and he returned to Ireland and bought up large tracts of land in Donegal. Adair had married in 1869, Cornelia Wadsworth Ritchie, a daughter of James S. Wadsworth, a Union general in the American Civil War. Altogether, about the creation of gardens and palaces.Adair’s ambition was to create an estate and castle that surpassed Balmoral, Queen Victoria’s Scottish retreat. John Adair is remembered with affection scarce in Donegal. On the heels of the Great Irish Famine and emigration level with Highland compartment, John Adair evicted 224 tenants from their blackhouses on his land. This was not for financial gain, but only to improve the aesthetic aspect of the castle. These approvals tenant called “Derryveagh evictions”. The name John George Adair Donegal landlord has gone down in history and folklore, ballad and documentary. All have one thing in common – Adair was notoriously cruel. He bought Glenveagh and Gartan 1859 do an estate of 28,000 acres (110 km 2 ).

His problems with the tenants began almost immediately. A row between them and Adair of shooting rights and infringement may culminated in the murder of his Scottish Steward James Murrog. Consequently Adair carried out its threat to evict tenancy. On 3 April 1861 a considerable cortege of 200 police officers, three noncommissioned officers, the resident judges and the sheriff stated from the Letter to perform their duties. Evictions began at Lough Barra, where a widow, Mrs. Hanna McAward and her six daughters and one son were the first to suffer. Desecration continued for three days by Magerashangan, Stag Hall, Claggan, Ardator and Castle among others townlands. A total of 44 families were evicted for a total of 244 people.

It is said that a curse was placed on the castle because of the cruel evictions resulting in any of the subsequent owners to carry any heirs to the family name.

Many of those evicted went to the Workhouse in Letterkenny, others with the help of local people and the clergy also took money. In Australia, Donegal Relief Fund revitalized and arrangements were made to help young people between 16 and 28 years to emigrate. Many took advantage of the system. When they settled in Sydney, the strong oral tradition ensured that the descendants kept his family’s bitter memories.

References

  1. Jump up ^ http://www.oracleireland.com/Ireland/Countys/donegal/z-glenveagh-castle.htm

Glenveagh

Glenveagh (from Irish Gleann Bheatha , meaning “glen of the birches” [1] ) is the second largest national park in Ireland. [2] The park covers 170 square kilometers of hillside above Glenveagh Castle on the shores of Lough Veagh ( Loch Ghleann Bheatha ), 20 km from Gweedore in County Donegal. The network of mainly informal gardens displays a variety of exotic and delicate plants from as far away as Chile, Madeira and Tasmania, all sheltered by windbreaks of pine trees and ornamental rhododendrons.

The farm was founded by John Adair, who became infamous for evicting 244 of his tenants and clearing the ground so that they would not destroy his views. Gardens and castle was presented to the Irish nation in 1981 by Henry P. McIlhenny of Philadelphia who had bought the farm 1937th

The park is home to the largest herd of red deer in Ireland and previously extinct golden eagle was reintroduced in the park in 2000.

See also 

  • List of Loughs in Ireland

References 

  1. Jump up ^ Glenveagh National Park: In-depth history Glenveagh
  2. Jump up ^ Ireland: Active Pursuits: National Parks | Frommers.com

Inishowen

Inishowen (Irish: Inis Eoghain , meaning “island of Eoghan”) is a peninsula in County Donegal, Ireland. It is the largest peninsula in all the island of Ireland. Inishowen is a picturesque place with a rich history. The peninsula includes Ireland’s most northerly point, Malin Head, along with Lagg sand dunes, some of the highest in Europe. The Grianan of Aileach, a ring fort that served as the royal seat of the Kingdom Ailech, stands at the entrance to the peninsula.

Geography

Inishowen is a peninsula of 884.33 square kilometers (218.523 acres), located in the northernmost part of the island of Ireland. It is bordered on the north by the Atlantic Ocean, to the east by Lough Foyle, and to the west of Lough Swilly. It is joined at the south to the rest of the island and is mostly in County Donegal in Ireland. The southeastern part of the peninsula is located in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, has been transferred from Donegal on behalf of London businesses as part of the Plantation of Ulster in the early 17th century. The peninsula is separated from the rest of Northern Ireland on the River Foyle.

After the last ice age peninsula was an island. Most of Inishowen’s population inhabit the peripheral coastal areas, while the interior consists of low mountains, mostly covered by swamps, of which the highest is the Slieve Snaght which is 619 meters (2,030 feet) above sea level. Other large hills located in the Malin Head peninsula, as well as Urris Hills in west Inishowen.Because of its geography, Inishowen usually has relatively more moderate weather conditions, with temperatures slightly lower than in other parts of Ireland in the summer and slightly warmer in the winter, especially during periods of extended cold weather.

Inishowen has several harbors, some of which are used for commercial fishing purposes, including Greencastle, Bunagee and Leenan. A season ferry crossing Foyle connecting Green with Magilligan County Londonderry, while another cross Swilly connecting Buncrana with Rathmullan. The village of Fahan has a privately built marina.

There are several small outlying islands off the Inishowen coast, mainly Inishtrahull and Glashedy islands, both uninhabited, although the former was inhabited until the early twentieth century. Inch, located in Lough Swilly is technically no longer an island, as it has a causeway connecting it to the mainland at Tooban, south of Fahan.

Lough Swilly is a fjord-like lough, and was of strategic importance for many years to the British Empire as a deep-water port. It is also known as the starting point for the Flight of the Earls. Lough Foyle is important, as the entrance to the River Foyle and the city of Derry, but is much more shallow than Lough Swilly, and requires the use of a pilot boat to guide ships to and from Londonderry Port.

A large area of land, most of which are now part of Grianan Farm , one of the largest farms in Ireland, was reclaimed from a shallow area in Lough Swilly, which stretches from the village of Burnfoot Bridgend and Burt. The contours of this country is conspicuous because of its flatness prove a stark contrast to the more mountainous area around it.

History

Which preceded the formation of County Donegal by centuries, the area was named Inis Eoghain (island of Eoghan) after Eogan mac Neill, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages ( Niall Naoigeallach , enhögkung), whose name was also used for Tyrone (Irish: Tír Eoghain ). Inis Eoghain is also the homeland Meic Lochlainn (descended from the tribe of Eoghan), a clan that grew so formidable that they eventually came under siege by a Limerick King, who came north to Aileach, and ordered the destruction of Aileach fort and to every soldier was to remove a stone from the fort to prevent its reconstruction. Later, after the fall of Meic Lochlainn was chieftainship of Inis Eoghain usurped by the Ó Dochartaigh clan (descended from the tribe Conaill), because they lost their own homeland in the Laggan valley area Tír Conaill.

Inishowen has many historical monuments dating back to the early settlements, and including the ruins of several castles and forts on Grianan Aileach. The ancient fort of Grianan Ailigh Burt was once the seat of högkung, both the High Kings of Meic Lochlainn, who held power in Inis Eoghain for many centuries. It was restored in the nineteenth century, although some damage in recent years has resulted in the partial collapse of the southern side of the wall. Among the main castle ruins Inishowen is Carrickabraghey on the Isle of Doagh, Norman Castle at Greencastle, Inch Castle, Buncrana Castle and Elagh Castle.

In 1196, John de Courcy, an Anglo-Norman knight who had invaded Ulster in 1177, defeated the king of Cenél Conaill and most of Donegal was at his mercy. Two years later he returned to devastate Inishowen. But in subsequent campaigns they Courcy defeated by O’Neill clan headed by his manager AED Méith and found himself unable to conquer the west of Ulster.[1]

1608 Sir Cahir O’Doherty, the last Gaelic Lord Inishowen and a former ally of the crown, launched O’Doherty revolt by burning Derry. After the defeat of the uprising lot of O’Doherty former countries was awarded to Arthur Chichester.

Ireland’s fatal traffic accident happened on the Inishowen in July 2010. [2] [3] [4] [5]

Demography

At the last census in Ireland in 2006, Inishowen counted a population of 31,802, an increase of 8.4% compared to 1996. [6] Buncrana is the largest city in Inishowen, with a population in 2006 of 3394 in its locality. [6]

Policy

At the national level, Inishowen is a part of Donegal constituency, which selects five TDs to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (the Irish Parliament). At the county level are Inishowen an electoral district, a municipal district, the election of nine councilors to Donegal County Council. Currently there are three members of Fianna Fáil, two each Sinn Féin and Fine Gael, the Labour Party and one independent. [7]

Media

In addition to the radio stations and newspapers available elsewhere in Donegal, several media are based solely on the peninsula, including two magazines (in Inish Times and Inishowen Independent , both published in Buncrana) and an online daily local news service (InishowenNews.com ).Inishowen is also home to the only community station in the county (Inishowen Community Radio, based in Carndonagh). The traditional source of news for Inishowen is the Derry Journal , published in nearby Derry city, since 1772. It still serves the peninsula as a paper of record.

Tourism

Inishowen 100 tourist route [8] is an approximately 100 mil signposted scenic drive around the peninsula. It takes in or passes near most of the tourist attractions and places of interest on the peninsula.

It starts at Bridgend where there is a picnic area with a large map and information boards. The first part of the coastal road along the coast of Lough Swilly. It passes Inch Island, Fahan (a blue flag beach), Fahan 18-hole golf course, Buncrana Town, Tullyarvan Mill (an interpretive center tracing over 250 years of textile manufacturing in Buncrana area.). It continues along the western shore of Lough Swilly.

The routes go Dunree beach, Dunree Fort (military museum) and then turns inland for Mamore Gap (between Urris Hills and Raghtin More mountain), Leenan Bay, Dunaff head Tullagh Bay (a blue flag beach), through the villages of Clonmany and Ballyliffin. Ballyliffin has a well respected golf course with 18 holes.

After Ballyliffin route passes the Isle of Doagh (where there is a famine museum and interpretive center). Next is Carndonagh – the second largest city in Inishowen, after which the road turns north again by Malin Town (known for having won its category in Ireland’s Tidy Towns competition several times), the last five fingers Beach and then up the mountain peak point and car park at Knockamany Bens, then back down to the sea with the route looks in the open Atlantic, before heading for Banba crown a peninsula off the peninsula, it is home to Ireland’s most northerly point Malin Head.

On the northeast coast passing the village of Culdaff and Culdaff Bay (another blue flag beach), remote Tramone Bay, Kinnagoe Bay. As the coast turns east reaches of Lough Foyle and Shroove at the mouth of the Lough and then Green (the port used by fishing boats and landing point for the car ferry to and from Magilligan in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland). Then as the road south along the Lough Foyle it passes through the city of Moville, Quigley Point and Muff village where the road turns right and heads back to Bridgend where the journey began.

Sports

As in other parts of Ireland, there are a wide variety of sports organizations and activities practiced on the peninsula.

Gaelic sports

Inishowen is no exception popularity Gaelic football in the county with several clubs representing the different churches in the peninsula. Each club has many different football teams for both sexes and different age groups.While throwing played at underage level of all the clubs there are, still, put no adult teams regularly of any of them. [1]

  • Beart CLG, Burt [2]
  • Buncrana GAA club [3]
  • Carndonagh GAA club [4]
  • Malin GAA club [5]
  • Moville GAA club [6]
  • Naomh Mr GAA club, Muff [7]
  • Urris GAA club [8]

Rugby

  • Inishowen Rugby [9]

Football

  • Inishowen Football League

Other sports

  • Cycling
  • Golf [10]
  • Horse riding
  • kayaking
  • Shooting – North Inishowen Gun Club [11]
  • Surfing
  • mountaineering

References

  1. Jump up ^ DeBreffny, D; Mott, G (1976). The churches and monasteries of Ireland. London: Thames & Hudson. pp. 60-61.
  2. Jump up ^ According to The Irish Times , “the National Roads Authority road safety expert Stephen Lambert said last night the death toll was the highest number of deaths in a single crash since records began in 1961”.
  3. Jump up ^ Watt, Alex (13 July 2010). “Funeral Plans for Men Killed in Crash Irish”. Sky News. BSkyB. Retrieved 13 July 2010.
  4. Jump up ^ “Funerals Donegal crash ‘. News BBC. BBC. 15 July 2010.Retrieved 15 July 2010.
  5. Jump up ^ “Eight fatal crash ‘worst on record’ ‘. Irish Independent.Independent News & Media. 12 July 2010. Retrieved 12 July 2010.
  6. ^ Jump up to: ab “Census 2006 Year-end”. Central Statistics Office of Ireland. In 2006. Taken 2010-02-06.
  7. Jump up ^ “Councillors of the Municipality Inishowen.” Donegal County Council. 14 April 2016.
  8. Jump up ^ “Inishowen 100 driving route”. Ride with GPS. 2010-07-04.Pulled 10/11/2014.

Fintown railway station

Fintown railway station served the village Fintown in County Donegal, Ireland.

The station was opened on June 3, 1903 on the Donegal Railway Company line from Glenties to Stranorlar. It closed December 15, 1947 when County Donegal Railways Joint Committee closed the line from Glenties to Stranorlar in an attempt to save money. [2] Freight traffic on the line continued until 10 March 1952. The station reopened on 3 June 1995, the newly formed earn 3 feet (914 mm) narrow gauge Fintown Railway along the former route used by the County Donegal railways joint Committee. The railway runs from Fintown along Lough Finn and the Glenties.

Fanad

Fanad (official name: Fánaid ) [2] is a peninsula that lies between the Lough Swilly and Mulroy Bay on the north coast of County Donegal in Ireland.Origin of name Fanad are lost in time although there is some speculation that the name derives from an old Gaelic word Fana for “sloping ground”. [3] It is also called Fannet or Fannett in older records. There are approximately 700 people living in Fanad and 30% of Irish speakers.

Fanad include assemblies of Clondavaddog, Killygarvan and parts of Tullyfern and Aughinish. It measures about 25 km north-south, measured from Fanad Head to the town of Ramelton and 12 km east-west, measured between the townlands of Doaghbeg and Glinsk. The southern boundary of the Fanad has been the subject of some controversy for centuries. In the 16th century, during the time of MacSuibhnes as ruler Fanad, it was noted that the territory Fanaid stretched as far south as the River Lennon between Kilmacrennan and Ramelton. In 1835, surveyor John O’Donovan Rathmullan known as the capital of Fanad, and he refers to Clondavaddog as “the northernmost parish Fanaid” , suggesting that Fanad included except Clondavaddog congregations. [4] O’Donovan also noted that “the residents of Inishowen state that Fanaid ranging from Rathmeltan to Mulroy Lough, but the natives of the holy Killygarvan, Tully and Aughnish, who considered themselves civilized, deny that they themselves are of men in Fanaid “ .

Surnames usually recorded in Fanad since the mid-19th century include Callaghan, Cannon / Canning, Carr / Kerr Coll, Coyle, Deeney, Doherty, Friel, fidelity, Gallagher, Martin, McAteer / McIntyre, McConigley / McGunnigal, McGinley / McKinley Sheil / Sheilds and Sweeney / McSwyne. [5]

Geology and Geography

Geological maps of County Donegal show adaptations mountain running southwest to northeast over Fanad peninsula. The underlying rock in the peninsula is mostly of Dalradianmeta-sedimentary rocks, which have been exposed by weathering and erosion over the millennia There are areas of granodiorite igneous rocks throughout the northern part of the peninsula from Ballywhoriskey to Fanad Head, but most of Fanad consists of US- Dalradian Quartzite and some Pellite rocks with local occurrences of slate and Tillites – the latter mainly concentrated around the northern entrance Mulroy Bay. [6]

The cliffs around Fanad Head is exposed granodiorite, while the higher ground running south from Fanad Head to Port Salon is a band of quartzite.Knock All Mountain is also formed of quartzite.

The landscape of Fanad shaped by geological processes that include the effects of recurrent coating of ice sheets and glaciers as recently as 14,000 years sedan.Reträtten of the ice sheet had a great impact on the Fanad and surrounding areas. It is speculated that a large part of the Lough Swilly was may have been dry land which was flooded due to a rise in sea level over the past 10,000 years. Mulroy Bay may be similarly formed at this time. Peat formations on the foreshore at White Beach north of Rathmullan contains the remainder of the trees submerged by the advance of the sea in this area.[7] Many of the beaches in Fanad shoreline was formed at this time of glacial deposits that are then reworked by the action of waves and streams.

As with much of the rest of Ireland, post-glacial landscape gradually changed with increases in temperature from open tundra to one dominated by forests of pine, oak, alder, hazel and birch, with a break in the canopy on the edges of the intermediate expanses of lake and bog . This was probably the landscape that greeted the earliest settlers who ventured along the coast in the late Mesolithic period, perhaps around 5000 BC. There is archaeological evidence of human occupation of coastal areas in Inishowen on Dunaff [8] , and west of Horn Head in this period and it is reasonable to assume that Fanad also saw some transient occupation at this time.

The subsequent development of the landscape in Fanad is probably more human intervention than the forces of nature, reflecting the transition from the visit of mesolitiskajägare, fishers and gatherers to the introduction of primitive agriculture in the Neolithic period from 4000 BC onwards. The tree-covered landscape in the Mesolithic period, would have given way gradually to a more open landscapes in rural areas, which marks the beginning of the contemporary landscape Fanad, with its mix of farmland at lower levels, with bushes and gorse covered highlands and swamps interspersed with occasional lakes and waterways.

History

Mesolithic and Neolithic periods

There is no specific evidence of human occupation of Fanad during the Mesolithic period (8000 – 4000 BC), but as noted already, it is reasonable to assume that there were no temporary occupation of the coastal sites during this period. The earliest evidence of human settlement in Fanad is probably the presence of megalithic court tombs in a variety of locations including Tyrladden, Drumhallagh Upper and Upper Crevary possibly dating from circa 4.000 to 3.500 BC. There is also the portal tombs or dolmens from the Neolithic period, including examples of Gortnavern south of Kerrykeel and the saltpans on Lough Swilly side of the peninsula. [9] These proposed as dating from about 3.800 to 3.200 BC.

Bronze Age and Iron Age

Proof of occupation of Fanad during the Bronze Age (2000 – 500 BC) continues in the form of tombs and similar monuments. Three possible stone circles probably belong to the Bronze Age have been identified near Rathmullan. Several casket burial sites as though to date from the Bronze Age discovered in Fanad including a group now destroyed in a cairn on Killycolman near Rathmullan. [10]

Ring forts (Cashels) and ornately carved stone characteristic of Donegal Iron Age (500 BC – 400 AD), including such major monuments Grianan Aileach.Evidence ring forts found in 35-40 places in Fanad, mainly in the coastal sites on both Swilly and Mulroy coasts. [11]

early Middle Ages

Bealoideas and the earliest records indicate that Fanad originally occupied by Corpraige from which St Colmcille’s mother Eithne is said to have come.[12] The Corpraige may have occupied an area as far south as the River Swilly and Bin Willy Mountain including Gartan.

In the early 7th century, Cenél Conaill, one of the tribes of Donegal are said to be descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages (Gaelic: Niall Noigiallach) and originating in Mag nItha in Lower Finn Valley, began to expand to Fanad, possibly forcing northward retreat Corpraige. All traces of Corpraige had disappeared from the area of the 12th century. [13] Congal Cennemigher Mac Fergus Fanad was högkung from 700 AD until his death in 710 AD. [14] It is established that the royal seat Cenél Connell power in Fanad was on Cashelmor in “between the waters” in the North West Fanad.

Cenél Conail subsequently reduced by virtue of the expansion of Cenél Eoghain Inishowen during the 8th century, especially after the battle of Clóitech in 789 when Cenél Conaill withdrew to areas south of Barnes. [15]With reduced power Cenél Conaill, territory Fanad came under control O’Breslins derived from Congel Cennemigher son. During this time, there are data on attacks from the Vikings on Fanad- specifically in Mulroy Bay on Kinnaweer near Milford in 921 AD. [16]

End of the Middle Ages

The power of O’Breslins in Fanad lasted until sometime after 1263, when the chieftains of Tir Conaill the O’Donnell granted under the chieftaincy of Fanad to MacSweeneys (Gaelic: MacSuibhne) in exchange for their support for some O ‘Donnell families in their struggle chieftaincy of the clan.

The MacSweeneys was galloglasses, (mercenary warrior) from Scotland, was responsible for the construction of the castle and the Carmelite Monastery in Rathmullan at the end of the 16th century. [17] The MacSweeneys was also responsible for the construction of the tower house on Moross on the upper parts of Mulroy Bay in around 1532. [18]

On the 17th and 18th centuries

The power of Sweeney as the Lords of Fanad ended with the Flight of the Earls in 1607 and the subsequent Plantation of Ulster, though they continued to hold some countries in Fanad that owners until 1641 rises, after which all remaining Sweeney countries were seized. The “familial Commandery” of Fanad left in Sweeney family.

Lands in Fanad were mainly granted servitors (Crown employees including veterans of the nine-year war). Settler noted in the 1654 Civil Survey include Richard Perkins BelliclanmcCallen (sic), William and David Lyne on Bunintyne (Bunnaton?), John Rowly on Ballymastocker, Craveross (Croaghross?) And Magherawarden, Thomas Stewart Carlan, Knockbrack and Drumfad, William Patton in Croghan, Colin and Patrick Campbell on Moross and Luke Ashe on Ballyhork. Some lands on Tullynadall granted to the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College.

Rathmullan originally granted to Sir Ralph Bingley but soon passed to his son-in-law, Bishop Knox. Rathmullan was incorporated as a town and in 1618, Knox changed Carmelite Friary serve as a mansion. It remained the residence of the Knox family until the late eighteenth century. [19] Also noteworthy at this stage was the construction of the Church of Ireland Rosnakill in 1693. [20]

Despite the plantation, Fanad retained its majority indigenous population and the way Gaelic and Irish remained the main spoken language of the peninsula – a situation that was generally unchanged until the mid 19’s. The 18th century introduced in Fanad rural industry with a corresponding improvement of the infrastructure. Livestock commercial herring fishery, flax and linen production became part of the local economy from the mid-18th century.

19th century

In the early 19th century, was also evident manufacture of curved hats, shoes and kelp production. Rathmelton was a major focus of the linen industry was found to have had the greatest pale green in Donegal in the late 18th century and early 19th century – a time of great success in the city. It also flourished as a port at this time. But linen and domestic shoe production went into decline in the 1820s and herring fisheries had also declined. As a result, emigration became the major part of life as the local population increased.[21]

Improvements in local infrastructure and facilities in the early part of the 19th century included the construction of a lighthouse on the Fanad Head in 1818 in response to the lowering of the frigate Saldanah in Lough Swilly 1804. A Framework Constructed on Milford about 1840, and a network of national schools arose some are sponsored by the landlord and some of the churches and religious organizations. The beginning of the 19th century also saw the construction of Catholic churches, starting with the construction of the chapel at Mass Mount Tamney close around 1780 on a site donated by the Patton in Croghan. Further building continued throughout the period, including a chapel of ease in Fanavolty circa 1840th

1837 Samuel Lewis published a topographical dictionary [22] which contained the following contemporary description of the church in Clondavaddog:CLONDEVADOCK or CLONDEVADOGUE, a parish in the Barony of KILMACRENAN, County Donegal and County Donegal, 15½ miles (NE) from Letterkenny; containing 9595 inhabitants. This assembly, which includes under the Ordnance Survey 27,367¼: Constitutional acres, of which 627¾ is water, located on the northwest coast; It comprehends the greater part of the peninsula district Fannet or Fanad, which extends north into the sea, and ends in the points called Maheranguna and Pollacheeny. is primarily occupied by mountains of considerable height, among which Knockalla is 1196 surface feet above the level of the sea: these are separated by deep and narrow valleys where the ground is reasonably good, consisting of a brown gravel mold, sometimes leans clay, on the basis of white clay, brownish or reddish clay, slate in different colors, and sometimes Freestone soft rock. The church contains about 60 quarters lands of good arable land and poor pasture land, with much waste and barren land: many acres have been covered and destroyed by the shifting sands. The point of Fannet are lazy. 55 ° 15 ’50 “(N) and lon 7 ° 39′. (W): it is on the west side of the entrance to Lough Swilly and a lighthouse was constructed on it, which the lamp has a height of 90 feet above the level of the sea at high tide, it consists of nine lights, showing a deep red light towards the sea, and a light fixed light towards the lough or the port, and can be seen in clear weather at the distance of 14 nautical miles. the seats are Croohan House, the residence of RH Patton, Esq.; Green, H. Babington, Esq.;and Springfield, M. Dill, Esq.

The living is a vicarage and rectory in the diocese of Raphoe and the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin: the tenth amounting to £ 463.5.4½. The Glebe-house was built by means of a loan of £ 100 from the end of the Board of First Fruits, 1795; The Glebe covers 240 acres, of which 160 are unmanaged. The church is a common structure, the repairs that the Church Commissioners have recently been granted £ 371.10.3. RC parish is coextensive with that of the established church, and contains two large chapel. There are five schools, of which the denominational schools, partly supported by annual donations from the headmaster and the late Colonel Robertson school fund. In these about 250 boys and 130 girls are instructed; and there are two wage schools, in which about 70 boys and 11 girls, and five Sunday schools.

The landscape evolved to reflect the development of local farms during this time. The presence of picturesque seascapes induced many local landowners to the site “big house” in the park setting overlooking Lough Swilly and Mulroy Bay. Besides the big houses listed by Lewis, other notable buildings constructed during this time included Drumhalla House (1789) by Dr. Knox, Fort Royal in Rathmullan (1807) by Charles Wray, Rathmullan House (1820) by Lieutenant Colonel Knox of Prehen and Glen House (1810) north of Rathmullan built by the Hart family. [23]

The 19th century they were a time of great change and upheaval in agriculture. In the first half of the century, many landowners began to introduce “improvements” to their holdings which effectively saw the end of clachans and old farming methods based around the old Rundale system. The farm scenery Fanad as we know it today, with small individual holdings and regulated limits were introduced from the 1830s onwards, often against the wishes of tenants. [24] The introduction of these “improvements” saw the closure of some major population centers in Fanad including well-established large Doaghbeg villages and Glinsk. Emigration continued and grew as a response to the significant increase in population, and in response to famine and food shortages, including the great famine in the late 1840s.Fanad population, estimated possibly around 4000 in 1766, was 10,344 and rising in 1841. However, it had dropped to 8244 in 1851 and continued to decline to a figure of 5778 1891st

Rural tourism emerged at this time – Fanad features in a 1849 travel guide [25]which states among other things that there are few more romantic places than Ramelton and its vicinity. The city contains three Presbyterian Meeting House, a Methodist chapel and a church: the Roman Catholic chapel is at a certain distance. There are corn mills and shops, a brewery and a bleach green. Although there is no bridge, are certain exports within these small vessels sailing up the harbor. Ramelton contains some good houses and two small inns where cars can be hired …… Rathmullan, its only street, church, battery and no trace of ecclestical and crenellated ruins but offers little to arrest the attention the traveler … Milford contains one or two pubs, a few shops, some respectable housing and in its vicinity a union workhouse .. … village Rosnakill will not detain the traveler, consists mainly of poor cottages but it contains the parish church, some small shops and one or two pubs …… .A good inn on Ballyvicstocker, a of the most wonderful of all our coastal bays and admirably suited for swimming, and where B. Barton, Esq., the holder of the Green Estate, and one or two others have built comfortable homes, with good roads from Ramelton and Rathmullan tend to persuade strangers to visit Fanad .

The second half of the 19th century witnessed the development of infrastructure of schools and other public buildings in the area. By c. 1858 schools had been established in a number of places including Bally, Michael, Doaghbeg, Ballyhiernan, Cashel Glebe, Tullyconnell, Croaghross, Leatbeg, Ballina, Muineagh, Drumfad and Glenvar. There was also a coastguard station, police barracks and a pharmacy and session house Tamney.

The second half of the 19th century was marked by the killing of Lord Leitrim, one of the big local landowners in Fanad and a man much reviled for his strictness in his dealing with their tenants. Leitrim kept much of the northern part of Fanad, with holdings ranging from Glinsk to Doaghbeg. The timing of Leitrim’s death coincided with a ground war that ended the era of landlord domination Fanad. In the decades that followed, and with the approval of various Irish Land Acts, ownership of a large part of the land in Fanad gone from landlords to their tenants. Other large landowners whose land passed into the ownership of its tenants included Barton who owned large areas of land in and around Portsalon, Henry Letham whose holdings were mainly Mulroy side of the peninsula, north of Kerrykeel and Thomas Norman whose land was located around Tamney and Rosnakill , just north of Henry Letham possession. [26]

20 and 21 centuries

In the first half of the 20th century, Fanad, like other coastal areas in Donegal, stuck in a pattern of subsistence farming. Employment outside agriculture was very limited, leading to continued high levels of migration, both permanent and seasonal workers, some overseas to the UK and the US, and a few cities in Ireland, including Derry and to a lesser extent, Belfast and Dublin. The decline in the population continued with the population registered as 2846 1961 about a quarter of that recorded in the 1840s.

The 2006 census reported a total population of 2131 for the electoral district in Carrowkeel, Rosnakill, Fanad Fanad North and South. By this time, agriculture declined significantly with limited livestock breeding as the main component of local agriculture. Local rural industry has grown to a certain extent with fish farming in Mulroy Bay and Lough Swilly as the main local source of employment, even for a time in the late 20’s and early 21’s, the building was undoubtedly a great source local revenue reflects the boom in the supply of homes and a general improvement of the local housing stock and infrastructure both in Fanad and in other parts of Donegal.

A notable addition to the local infrastructure was the construction of a major road bridge at the north end of the Mulroy Bay in 2009, which allows for easy access from Fanad west to Carrigart, Downings and other towns and villages along the northern coast. Tourism also gave some limited seasonal employment.

Some consolidation of local facilities has taken place during the past half century, reflecting the decline in the population. There has been a consolidation of the national school network in a small number of larger sites. Many local shops have closed, partly because of population decline but also undoubtedly due to the increased mobility of the population now has the opportunity to trade on the major population centers such as Letter.

Sports

Fanad Gaels, the local Gaelic Athletic Association club, has won several minor titles in the last 10 years.The club was formed in 1982. In 1994, a new park was opened Pairc Uí Shiadhail. The club began life in the County Division 4th

In 2006, the club had a most successful year, won the All County League Division 2 final, as well as reaching County Intermediate Final and an All-Ireland final in Comórtas Peile na Gaeltachta. In 2007, the club made further progress by winning Donegal Intermediate Championship in Pairc Sean Mhic Cumhaill for the first time.

The club would win another Donegal Intermediate title in 2009 and continue to compete at a very high standard in the Middle class in the years that followed. 2013 saw the capture of Comórtas Peile na Gaeltachta title that had eluded them in 2006 and 2014 were brought to a close with the club won its first and only Donegal Intermediate Championship at the reserve level.

The local football team Fanad United was founded in 1971 and has always been among the best football teams in the country. They were the first members of the Donegal League, claiming their first Allsvenskan title in 1973 in what was the first in a historic three in a row. Fanad moved from Junior to Intermediate football in 1986 with the formation of the Ulster Senior League and has dominated the competition since its inception winning the league championship in no less than 12 times.

At the national level Fanad United have also been significant in both FAI Senior Cup and League Cup. Their most famous performances in the League Cup came in 1987 when they reached the semi-finals before losing to Shamrock Rovers in the last four. In 1992 FAI Cup in a 2-0 win away to the Home Farm was followed by a marathon 3 game saga against the St. James Gate. 1996 claimed Fanad arguably the most famous scalp in their history when they beat Bray Wanderers 4-0 in Carlisle Grounds. To this day is still one of the biggest victories with a non-league side to the leading opposition in the Cup.

In 1979 Fanad claimed their first national title when they won the FAI Youth Cup by beating Shelbourne 3-1 in the final at Swilly Park. Nine years later, they became the first team from Donegal to win the Intermediate Cup when they beat Tramore Athletic (Cork) 1-0 in the final at Dalymount Park. A second Intermediate Cup followed in 1995 with a 1-0 victory over College Corinthians in the decider at Terry Park.

Surfing has become very popular on the Fanad peninsula with lots of locals who take up the sport very successful.

See also

  • Ireland portal
  • Lighthouses in Ireland

References

  1. Jump up ^ Rowlett, Russ. “Lighthouses in the West of Ireland (Ulster and Connacht)”. The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Download February 10, 2016.
  2. Jump up ^ placenta (Ceantair Ghaeltachta) Order 2004
  3. Jump up ^ The anglicized word Irish placenames Tom Burnell (2006)
  4. Jump up ^ O’Donovans’s Ordnance Survey Letters Donegal in 1835 by Michael Herity (2000)
  5. Jump up ^ Reflecting the frequency of occurrence of the names recorded in Griffith’s Primary Valuation of the 1850s.
  6. Jump up ^ As of maps and text Chapter One – Geology and Geomorphology of Moore, Cooper, Dunlop and Jackson, from Lough Swilly – a living landscape, Ed.Andrew Cooper (2011)
  7. Jump up ^ As of maps and text Chapter One – Geology and Geomorphology of Moore, Cooper, Dunlop and Jackson, from Lough Swilly – a living landscape, Ed.Andrew Cooper (2011)
  8. Jump up ^ Ref. Chapter 1 – prehistoric and early historic agreement in Donegal Brian Lacy from Donegal History and Society – Ed. Nolan, Ronayne & Dunlevy (1995)
  9. Jump up ^ National Monuments Service – Archaeological Survey Database
  10. Jump up ^ National Monuments Service – Archaeological Survey Database
  11. Jump up ^ National Monuments Service – Archaeological Survey Database
  12. Jump up ^ Chapter 3 – early medieval geography West Donegal from Cenél Conaill and Donegal Kingdoms of Brian Lacey (2006)
  13. Jump up ^ Chapter 7 – The emergence of Cenél Conaill from Cenél Conaill and Donegal Kingdoms of Brian Lacey (2006)
  14. Jump up ^ Chapter 3 – early medieval geography West Donegal from Cenél Conaill and Donegal Kingdoms of Brian Lacey (2006)
  15. Jump up ^ Per Chapter Twelve – The Triumph of Cenél hEogain and the invention of “The North” from Cenél Conaill and Donegal Kingdoms of Brian Lacey (2006)
  16. Jump up ^ Per Chapter Four – Sandhills, silver and shrines of Raghnall O’Floinn from Donegal History and Society – Ed. Nolan. Roynane and Dunlevy (1995)
  17. Jump up ^ According to chapter six -Late Medieval Donegal Katherine Simms and Gaelic families of County Donegal from Donegal History and Society – Ed. Nolan. Roynane and Dunlevy (1995)
  18. Jump up ^ National Monuments Service – Archaeological Survey Database
  19. Jump up ^ Per Chapter Four – Archaeology and History Lough Swilly by Thomas McErlean, from Lough Swilly – a living landscape, Ed.Andrew Cooper (2011)
  20. Jump up ^ National Monuments Service – Archaeological Survey Database
  21. Jump up ^ Per Chapter Thirteen – The development of City Network by WH Crawford from Donegal History and Society – Ed. Nolan. Roynane and Dunlevy (1995)
  22. Jump up ^ County Londonderry & Donegal – a topographical Dictionary of townships, villages and cities in the county in the 1830s by Samuel Lewis (1837)
  23. Jump up ^ Per Chapter Four – Archaeology and History Lough Swilly by Thomas McErlean, from Lough Swilly – a living landscape, Ed.Andrew Cooper (2011)
  24. Jump up ^ The original OS maps for Fanad that considered in the late 1820’s and early 1830 show clachans. The maps produced at the time of Griffith’s Primary Valuations in the early 1850s shows the origins of the current land holdings.
  25. Jump up ^ A handbook for travelers in Ireland James Fraser (1849)
  26. Jump up ^ Per holding maps in the introduction to the outer edge of the Ulster Hugh Dorrian – Ed. Brendan MacSuibhne and David Dickson (2000)

Donegal Castle

Donegal Castle (Irish: Caislean Dhun na nGall ) is a castle located in the center of Donegal Town, County Donegal in northwest Ireland. For most of the past two centuries, most of the buildings lay in ruins, but the castle was almost completely restored in the late 1990s.

The castle consists of a 15-century rectangular keep at a later Jacobean-style wing. The complex is located on a bend in the River Eske, near the mouth of Donegal Bay and is surrounded by a 17th century boundary wall. There is a small gatehouse at the entrance mirroring the design of the Keep. Most of the stone was constructed from locally limestone with some sandstone. The castle was a stronghold of the O’Donnell clan, Lords of Tír Conaill and one of the most powerful families in Gaelic Ireland from the 5th to the 16th centuries.

On Wednesday, May 25, 2016, the castle was visited by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, during his official visit in County Donegal.

History

Donegal (Ireland, Dun Na nGall), which translates into Foreigner Fort , possibly from a Viking fortress in the area were destroyed in 1159. But because of hundreds of years of development, has no archeological evidence of this early fortress was found. The elder Sir Hugh O’Donnell, wealthy head of the O’Donnell clan, built the castle in 1474. At the same time, he and his wife Nuala, built ettfranciskanerkloster monastery further down the river. A local legend [ citation needed ] tells of a tunnel that connects the two, but no evidence of this was found. Castle is considered one of the finest Gaelic castle in Ireland. This is indicated by a report from the visiting English Viceroy, the Lord Deputy of Ireland, Sir Henry Sidney, in 1566, in a letter to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, the Lord High Treasurer, describes it as “the largest and strongest fortress in all Ireland “, adding: [1]

“It’s the biggest I’ve ever seen in an Irish hands: and appears to be in good storage, one of the most fair is on good ground, and so nigh a portable water a boat of ten tons can come within ten yards of it”

In 1607, after nine years of war the leaders of the clan O’Donnell left Ireland in the Flight of the Earls. In 1611 the castle and its lands were granted an English captain, Basil Brooke. Keep had been seriously damaged by the outgoing O’Donnell to prevent the castle used the Gaelic clans but was quickly restored by its new owners. Brooke has also added windows, a gable and a large manor wing to keep all the Jacobean style. Brooke family owned the castle for many generations until it fell into a devastating condition in the 18th century. In 1898 the then owner, Earl of Arran, donated the castle to the Office of Public Works.

Restoration

Recently, the Office of Public Works has renovated the castle. Keep have had new roofs and floors added in line with the original styles and techniques used in the 15th and 17th centuries. The stone has been restored and manor wing is partly roofed. The oak wood used came from Brookeborough Estate in County Fermanagh. The castle is now open to the public and often hosts events such as the Gaelic cultural evenings.

References

  1. Jump up ^ Calendar government paper for Ireland, 1566

Donegal Town

Donegal or Donegal Town (/ d n ʌ I ɡ ɔː l / or / d ʌ n ᵻ ɡ ɔː l / dun -in-gawlIrish: Dun Na nGall , which means “the fort foreigners” [1] ) is a city in County Donegal, Ireland Identification historically written in English as Dunnagall or Dunagall.

Donegal gave its name to County Donegal, although Lifford is now the county town. Until the early 17th century, Donegal was the “capital” of Tír Chonaill , a gaelic kingdom checked avO’Donnell clan of Cenél Conaill .Donegal sits at the mouth of the River Eske and Donegal Bay, which is overshadowed by the Blues Mountains (the Croaghs “). The city circumvented avN15 and N56 roads. In the middle of the city, known as The Diamond, is a hub of music, poetry and cultural gatherings in the area.

History

There is archaeological evidence of settlements around the city dates to prehistoric times including the remains of round forts and other defensive earthworks.

St. Patrick was captured by raiders from the clans governed by Niall of the nine hostages, and this region is that Patrick back, are familiar with the people, language, customs and lands. [ Citation needed ] The first tribe to convert to Christianity as a result of St. Patrick’s effort was Clan Connaill (also known while Clan Dálaigh: in English, this is pronounced Daley and it can be translated as “one in a leading role”). Connall was a son of Niall of the nine hostages. As a result of their acceptance of Christianity, Patrick blessed clan members; the sign of the cross appeared on the chief’s shield, and it was not just the heraldic device of the clan, but also for County Donegal.

Donegal town itself is famous for being the former center of the government of the O’Donnell clan, the great Gaelic royal family styrdeTír Chonaill in western Ulster for centuries and who played a crucial role in Irish history.Their original homeland was further north in the area Kilmacrenan. From the 15th to the 17th century, they were an important part of the resistance to the colonization of Ireland by England. The town itself contains Donegal castle, on the banks of the River Eske and the remains of Donegal Abbey, a Franciscan monastery dating back to the 15th century on the south shore of the bay. Annals of the Four Masters may have been partially written in the old convent in the 1630s . The story of Aodh Rua Ó Domhnaill (Red Hugh O’Donnell, also known as Red Hugh II), Lord of Tyrconnell, was the inspiration behind many books and films, not least, Disney’s The Fighting Prince of Donegal .

In 1601 Siege of Donegal took place in Tyrone rebellion. After the Flight of the Earls from Rathmullan close in September 1607, the castle and its land confiscated by the English crown and given to an Englishman, Captain Basil Brooke, as part of the Plantation of Ulster. Brookebeviljades castle around 1611 and he continued to perform extensive reconstruction work and added a wing to the castle in the Jacobean style. The current plan of the city was also posted by Brooke, including an attractive square known as The Diamond .From the late 17th to the early 20th centuries, formed Donegal part of the great estates of the Gore family (from 1762 Earls of Arran in the Peerage of Ireland) and it was under their ownership that the town took its present appearance. [ Needed citation ] Donegal Borough returned two members to the Irish house of Commons, the lower house of parliament in Ireland, until the law Union came into force in January 1801. Evidence of the Irish Famine still exists including a workhouse, whose buildings are now part of the local hospital, and many famine graves.

Industry and Tourism

 

The Church of Ireland at night in Donegal Town.

There are many sandy beaches in the area Donegal, such Murvagh beach, and some boasting good surfing conditions, such Rossnowlagh. Donegal is also used as a base for hill-walking in the nearby mountains Blues. Despite the city’s many hotels catering to visitors, it suffers from a lack of social amenities for the locals. Many have to travel to nearby towns such as Letterkenny for facilities such as swimming pools, movie theaters and major shopping centers. [2]

Like most clothing manufacturers in Ireland, the size of the workforce has been in decline for many years. Donegal also has a long tradition of weaving rugs. Donegal carpets made in Killybegs for over a hundred years and has proven to Aras an Uachtarain, the University of Notre Dame and the White House.

Transport

The Bus Eireann service 64 Derry / Galway route: this makes several other stops including Letterkenny and Sligo (which enables the rail links from Iarnród Éireann, from Sligo Mac Diarmada station in Sligo to Dublin Connolly. This route also enables train from Londonderry Railway Station to Belfast via Coleraine. the number of 30 Donegal Town / Dublin route makes stops at other important towns such as Enniskillen (providing connections to Belfast via Ulsterbus.) [3] Two private companies operate the other lines: “McGeehan bus runs a regular service from Glencolumbcille [4] and Dungloe[5] in West Donegal to Dublin Airport and Busaras in Dublin, passing through the city, [6] while Feda O’Donnell Coaches (also known as bus Feda) runs a regular Glenties / Galway who stay in Donegal . [7]

Donegal Town railway station was opened September 16, 1889 finally closed 1 January 1960. [8] The location of the old station is now used by CIE as a bus depot while the building is home to Donegal Railway Heritage Centre. [9]

Sports

Donegal town is home to many amateur sports clubs. The most popular sport in the area is Gaelic football and the local GAA club is four Masters. [10]The club has also been developing hurling. Other popular sports are soccer, rugby, basketball and athletics.

Donegal Town hosted the final stage of the World Rally Championship February 1, 2009 and was seen by 68 million people worldwide.

Media

The city is home to the regional newspapers Donegal Democrat and Donegal Post and the local Donegal Times [11] newspaper. The North West Expressregional magazine is also distributed throughout the city and surrounding county, which is the Derry Journal . Ocean FM, an independent local radio station from Collooney, County Sligo, has one of its three studios in the city, which sends most of South County Donegal. Highland Radio, which is based in Letterkenny can also be received in the city.

Donegal Town hosted the final stage of the World Rally Championship 1 February 2009 and seen by 68 million people worldwide.

Notable people

  • Paul Durcan, Gaelic football goalkeeper
  • Karl Lacey, Gaelic footballer and 2012 All Stars Footballer of the Year
  • Alexander Porter, United States Senator
  • Colonel Robertson, soldier and philanthropist
  • Pauric Sweeney, fashion designer
  • John White, Conservative MP in the Canadian House

Surname

The most common surnames in Donegal at the time of the United Kingdom Census 1901: [12]

  • 1. Martin
  • 2. McGinty
  • 3. Cassidy
  • 4. Callaghan
  • 5. Gallagher
  • 6. Stevenson
  • 7. Wray
  • 8. Thomas
  • 9. Morrow
  • 10. Slevin

Climate

The climate in this area has mild differences between peaks and valleys, and there is enough rain all year round. The Köppen climate classification subtype for this climate, “Cfb” (Marine West Coast Climate / Oceanic climate). [13]

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland
  • Abbey Vocational School
  • List of abbeys and priories in Ireland (County Donegal)

References

  1. Jump up ^ Donegal Town website
  2. Jump up ^ Letter Information Letter Reunion, Earagail Arts Festival, Donegal Rally, St. Patrick’s Day. Letterkennyhomes.com (18 August 2008). Retrieved July 23, 2013.
  3. Jump up ^ Bue Éireann website
  4. Jump up ^ http://www.buseireann.ie/pdf/1349438037-490.pdf
  5. Jump up ^ http://www.buseireann.ie/pdf/1349438036-492.pdf
  6. Jump up ^ McGeehan Bus website
  7. Jump up ^ Bus Feda website
  8. Jump up ^ “Donegal station” (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways.Hämtad23 September of 2007.
  9. Jump up ^ County Donegal Railway Restoration Ltd. website
  10. Jump up ^ Four Masters GAA Club
  11. Jump up ^ The Donegal Times Online
  12. Jump up ^ The most common surnames in Donegal
  13. Jump up ^ Climate Summary for Donegal
  14. Jump up ^ “Weatherbase.com”. Weather Base. 2013. Retrieved July 12, 2013.

The Derryveagh Mountain

The Derryveagh Mountain (Irish: Cnoic Dhoire Bheatha ) is the largest mountain range in County Donegal, Ireland. It constitutes a large part of the country of the county, and is the part of Ireland with the lowest population density. The mountains separate the coastal parts of the county, såsomGweedore and Glenties, from the large inland cities such as Ballybofey and Letterkenny. The highest peak is Mount Errigal.

Bundoran

Bundoran (Irish: Bun Dobhráin ) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. The city is located on the N15 road near Ballyshannon, and is the southernmost city in Donegal. The town is a popular tourism badortoch has been in the center for the local economy since 1777. [2] Bundoran is a world famous surfing area and was listed by National Geographic magazine in 2012 as one of the world’s top 20 surf towns. [3] [4]

History

Origins

Bundoran, or as it is known in Irish Bun Dobhráin (meaning the foot of a little water), was until more than a century ago, two separate villages.Bundoran was the village west of the bridge over the river Bradoge. This area is now known as the West End . East of the bridge, about 2 kilometers (1 mile) away, was the single village street. Between these two separate communities were townland of Drumacrin. Drumcacrin The area is now part of what is today downtown. Single Street was where most of the locals lived. It was only after the completion of the railway Enniskillen and Bundoran1868, which opened a terminal as it is called Bundoran , [5] that the two distinct communities developed and merged into what today is called Bundoran.

The first official record of Bundoran is a deposition of Hugh Gaskein 16 May 1653. He was a witness to the events during the 1641 uprising when he was an apprentice butcher in Sligo. [6] In 1689 a skirmish was fought near Bundoran between a Jacobite force under SirConnell Ferrall and the retreating Protestant garrison in Sligo.

William Cole, Viscount Enniskillen, built in Bundoran Lodge, his summer home in 1777. This building still stands on Bayview Avenue and is now called Homefield House. Viscount seems to have started a trend among his contemporaries as more of them discovered Bundoran and visited there to enjoy the sea and what was considered its health benefits.

The public roads

The rights of people to have access to the beach was blocked by a local landlord, but the locals found a champion in the parish priest Canon Kelaghan who fought in court in 1870 to ensure that the roads and paths to the beach remained open to the public. Canon Kelaghan also had the current Catholic Church was built in 1859. [7]

Railway

The opening of Enniskillen and Bundoran Railway (BR & E) 1868 connected Bundoran railway station with Ireland’s growing rail network [5] and made the city more accessible from Belfast, Dublin and other urban areas in the east and northeast coasts of Ireland. The Great Northern Railway (GNR) operated E & BR line from 1876 and absorbed the company in 1896. [8]

During this period Bundoran emerged as one of Ireland’s most popular seaside resorts. In the late 19th century it had become one of the major seaside resorts in Ulster. Hotels and lodging houses were opened around the city and GNR built the Great Northern Hotel, Bundoran one of the most famous landmarks. [9]

Rougey Cliff Walk.

During the Emergency of 1939-1945 GNR presented Bundoran Express [10]who switched Dublin and Bundoran through Dundalk and Enniskillen. [11] It also allowed the pilgrims to and frånPettigo, which was the nearest station to Lough Derg in County Donegal. [10] There was also through trains between Bundoran and Belfast. [12]

The partition of Ireland in 1922 turned the border with County Fermanagh in an international border. Henceforth Bundoran only rail link with the rest of the Irish Free State was over Northern Ireland, and as such was subject to delays for customs controls. The government of Northern Ireland closed a lot of GNR network on its side of the border in 1957, including E & BR as far as the border. [13] [14] This gave the Republic no practical alternative but to allow the closure of the line between the border and Bundoran. Then nearest railheads Bundoran was Sligo in the Republic and Omagh in Northern Ireland, until 1965 the Ulster Transport Authority closed the line through Omagh, too. [13] [15]

Today, the nearest railway station to Bundoran is Sligo Mac Diarmada Station in Sligo Town and Waterside Station in Derry.

Bundoran Beach

For almost two centuries, people have flocked to Bundoran beach during hot summer days. The tradition of bathing boxes began during the Victorian period. They are mainly used by members of the gentry, who were reticent about undressing in public. The boxes have pushed on wheels, to the water and the customer into the box through a door, put on her bathing suit and went out another door to get into the sea. The box remained there until the bathers was clear, dry and fully clothed again. The bath box was brought back to its original location on the beach, ready for the next customer.

Stationary bathing boxes were introduced in the early 1900s. They proved to be more suitable and less expensive for the public. In the 1920s, Mrs. Elizabeth Travers and her brother-in-law, Bilshie Travers (uncle the famous Bilshie Travers, former Mayor of Bundoran) hired the boxes from the municipality. For three old pennies a client hired a swimsuit and six old pennies they can rent “the whole package” that consisted of a bathing cap, suit and towel. The swimsuit was washed in a bucket and hung to dry until the next customer arrived. A familiar sight on the beach during the 1950s and 1960s was “The Duck”. This was a former British Army amphibious vehicles that ferried tourists out on the bay. It was driven by the Rooney family.Although prone to break down, it was a major attraction at the time. [16]

Promenade to Tullan Beach From Bundoran Bridge and looking out towards the sea is Cladach Leathan (the wide beach) which is Ireland Bill Stone, named after the rescue of a shipwrecked sailor. Beyond it’s world class surf break on the top. At the end of the promenade is Carraig na Sea (the mountain of the birds). Pump house overlooking the bay was built by local landlords the Hamiltons 1861. Nearby is a Carraig Choisceim (cutting step).Next to it is Poll Uain which is also known as The Horse Pool. The Thrupenny pool was named after the price of admission. The main beach called Tra Na Draina (string of the strong), where according to legend the giant Culina wrestled with his son, both unaware of each other’s identitet.Den little stream that enters the sea on the beach is Sruthan na Cuil Fhinne (the little stream of the real girl). Coral and brachiopod fossils embedded in the old and iconic cliffs Rougey are over 300 million years old. The area around the trampolines bear witness to a curious local custom, where protocol dictates that you must jump off the “Top Rock ‘as a ritual of early adulthood. The lower bar misogynistic given the title of “Lady’s Ledge ‘. At the tip of Rougey is Aughrus (Peninsula of a knight), where martial horses Conall Gulban O’Donnell and pickled. Passing the golf links we get to Pol and Pol Uaine Tobi, popular fishing spots. Next is the “Puffing Hole”. We now come to the Fairy bridges and “Wishing Chair”. Below is Tullan Beach, where the first inhabitants of the area used flint from the rocks to make tools.

“Beautiful Bundoran”

The song “Beautiful Bundoran” was very popular throughout Ireland in the 1950s, and it was performed by Sinéad O’Connor in the film The Butcher Boy .[17]

Central Hotel Fire

Main article: Fire Central Hotel, Bundoran

Tragedy struck August 8, 1980, when a fire broke out at The Central Hotel in the heart of town.Ten people died as a result, including five children. In September 2008, the church installed a hand-painted glass windows made by the world famous Harry Clarke (1889-1931), a window for many years hidden in the parish house of the local Catholic Church. The Council also erected a stone monument carved bench on Central Lane (next to Central Hotel) in August 2010 as a sign of respect lists the names of the ten people who lost their lives.

The Olympic selection

After winning his second Olympic medal, boxer Paddy Barnes was vocal in his intention to go to Bundoran for some relaxation. Self and Michael Conlon was pretty keen to get there. [18]

Transport

Dare

  • The opening in April 2006 in Bundoran / Ballyshannon bypass has made the resort more accessible. Sligo is 35 kilometers (22 miles) south of Bundoran along the scenic Atlantic coast. The Drowes River, where the southern part of the bypass started and which differs from County Leitrim County Donegal, is also the border point between the provinces of Connacht Ulster in the south and the north.

Rail

  • Bundoran railway station was opened June 13, 1866, but finally closed 1 October 1957. [19] The new council office car park is where Bundoran railway station once stood.

The nearest railway station is Sligo Mac Diarmada in Sligo Town Station, where trains to Dublin Connolly and operated by Iarnród Éireann. Buses from Bundoran to Sligo Sligo stop at the bus station located next to Sligo Mac Diarmada Station. Irish Rail Official site – Timetables, services and bookings

Coach / Bus

service Description

Bus Eireann buses connect Bundoran to Sligo Mac Diarmada Station in Sligo Town. Bus Eireann also run regular service, several times a day, from Derry to Galway, via Letterkenny and Bundoran. Feda O’Donnell goes private buses Sligo to Bundoran too. It also provides paths to and from Gweedore via Letterkenny, Donegal Town, Ballyshannon and Bundoran Western Ireland, including Sligo and Galway. There is also a regular bus service from Bundoran to Enniskillen.

bus stops

There are a number of bus stops in the city, but the most important are the East and West bus stop bus stop. The route (s) serving each stop specified in the table below.

Bundoran bus stops

Stop Route (s)
East bus stop Bus Éireann 064 Expressway / 480 to Bally (change to the Dublin / Enniskillen / Cavan) / Donegal / Ballybofey / Letterkenny / DerryBus Éireann 064 Expressway to Sligo / Knock Airport / Galway, 480to Drumcliffe / Sligo

Bus Eireann 483 to Kinlough / Ballintrillick (Fridays only)

Bus Eireann 495 to Kinlough / Largydonnell / Manorhamilton (Fridays only)

Astoria Road Ulsterbus 195 to Belleek / Pettigo (connection to Ennis).
Hollyrood Hotel Bus Feda Sligo / Knock / Clare / Tuam / Galway
Tourist Bus Feda Sligo / Donegal / Letter / Gweedore / Crolly
West bus stop Bus Éireann 064 Expressway / 480 to Bally (change to the Dublin / Enniskillen / Cavan) / Donegal / Ballybofey / Letterkenny / Derry064 Expressway to Sligo / Knock Airport / Galway, 480 to Drumcliffe / Sligo
Great Northern Hotel Innisfree CoachesNatt to / from Sligo (Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights only).
Parking Innisfree CoachesNatt to / from Sligo (Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights only).

The latest developments

Bundoran has seen much development over the past decade, due to its popularity as a destination by the sea and access to tax incentives for the development of holiday homes. Bundoran Thousands of music fans attend in Bundoran Sea Sessions Surf and Music Festival every June. [20]

Astoria Ballroom

Astoria Ballroom was built in 1953 at a time when dance was an important social activity. Show Bands spent many years entertaining large crowds in Astoria Ballroom. In recent years, the Astoria Ballroom, owned by Brian McEniff, was to have a number of facelifts and temporary name changes from Earth Nightclub to Bling , and in the 1980s expanded to add a new bar.Astoria Ballroom was a listed building. But November 29, 2008 it was destroyed by fire. It took fire brigades in Bundoran, Ballyshannon and Belleek over nine hours to extinguish. Bundoran Two firefighters sustained burns from the fire.

Training

On Railway Road stands the St. Louis school, which was built in 1892. The buildings included a school and residence for the Sisters of St. Louis. One of the buildings at a standstill today. Around the same time, the Sisters of St. Louis had his secondary school next to the old Grand Central Cinema in the venue called The Sea View Hotel.

St. Joseph’s orphanage was erected from funds bequeathed by the late Miss Sarah Crudden, Newtownbutler. These buildings later became known as Ard Lughaidh, much of the building was stone and had a great sport and theater hall all in 2006 VEC demolished them without reason too. All that is left of the land is ultimately devoted to the 1980s with the “live in” students at Ard Lughaidh, but this is now under the ownership of Donegal Adventure Centre.Because of the declining classes of Ard Lughaigh in the 1990s, the school faced closure and some students moved to Bally. [1] Some of St. Louis nuns moved to St. Louis building on Railway Road, but a lot of moving. [2]

Sports

Surf

Recently, Bundoran been noted as a surfing place. [21]

Golf

There is a golf course with 18 holes in Bundoran. The golf club was founded in 1894. The course is situated on the historic Great Northern Railway Company location, the old railway sleepers include a golf course that has the most breathtaking and beautiful views of the Atlantic Ocean. The course is a challenging experience despite its short length. [22]

Gaelic game

Bundoran GAA in the 1920s was in Bundoran on the railroad did Bundoran local ground a comfortable place for many big games. The GAA club grounds were purchased in 1938. The club was reorganized and renamed “The Star of the Sea ‘. FIFA park has undergone many developments over the years. The soil was leveled 1947 contained in 1951. The club dressing was constructed 1972. [16]

The juniors were successful in both the 1956 and 1960 World Cup. 1963, the “Star of the Sea” associated with the Bally team Aodh Ruadh to become St.Josephs. The team included many players who contributed to Donegal the county team, including Brian McEniff and former Donegal County Council President Michael McLoone. In 1977 the club again split into two clubs, one each for the towns of Bundoran and Ballyshannon.

1979 beat Bundoran, Ballybofey in a nail-biting one point win to win the Senior Championship. Local man Brian McEniff led Donegal to 1992 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final, where they defeated Dublin in the final 0-18 to 0-14. Bundoran was the scene of large parties for almost a month later. [16]

Notable people

  • Brian McEniff, former Donegal manager
  • Sean McEniff, Fianna Fáil politicians
  • Liam MacDaid, Lord Bishop of Clogher
  • Louis Lipsett, a former major general in the British Army
  • Richie Fitzgerald, surfers

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland
  • List of cities in Northern Ireland
  • List of twinning in Ireland
  • List of RNLI stations
  • Wild Atlantic Way

References

  1. Jump up ^ “Census 2006 – Volume 1 – Population Classified by Area” (PDF). Central Statistics Office Census 2006 reports . Central Statistics Office of Ireland. April 2007. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  2. Jump up ^ Discover Bundoran – Tourist information from the Irish capital Fun!
  3. Jump up ^ world’s best Surftown – National Geographic
  4. Jump up ^ “Bundoran – Donegal”. Discovering Ireland. Retrieved 26 March 2013.
  5. ^ Jump up to: ab . Hajdučki, Maxwell S. (1974) A railway Atlas of Ireland .Newton Abbot: David & Charles. 6. map ISBN 0-7153-5167-2.
  6. Jump up ^ Wood-Martin, WG (1882 to 1892). History Sligo, County and City. From accession of James I to the revolution in 1688 Dublin. Hodge & Figgis. pp. 253-257.
  7. Jump up ^ Bundoran public road (1870). Dublin: Mc Glaghan and Magill
  8. Jump up ^ Hajdučki, op. cit. , page xiii
  9. Jump up ^ “News and sports in Donegal – Belle of Bundoran back after 33 years – Donegal News”. Donegalnews.com. Retrieved 26 March 2013.
  10. ^ Jump up to: ab McCutcheon, Alan (1970). Ireland . Railway History in pictures. 2 . Newton Abbot: David & Charles. p. 58. ISBN 0-7153-4998-8.
  11. Jump up ^ Baker, Michael HC (1972). Irish railways since 1916 London.Ian, Allan. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-7110-0282-1.
  12. Jump up ^ McCutcheon, 1970, pp 115
  13. ^ Jump up to: ab Hajdučki, op. cit. , map 39
  14. Jump up ^ McCutcheon, 1970, pp 153, 207
  15. Jump up ^ McCutcheon, 1970, pp 155, 209
  16. ^ Jump up to: abc Geagan, M. (2011) Dancing at sea: A journey through time in Bundoran area. Bundoran: Stra Comer Press ISBN 978-0-9568847-0-1
  17. Jump up ^ “Other”.
  18. Jump up ^ “Olympic boxer enjoying Bundoran.” Donegal Daily . August 19, 2012. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  19. Jump up ^ “Bundoran station” (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways .Hämtad13 September of 2007.
  20. Jump up ^ Sea Sessions Surf & Music Festival, Bundoran, Donegal, Ireland
  21. Jump up ^ “Emerald Swell: Riding icy waves of a raging sea,” the New York Times , March 27, 2008
  22. Jump up ^ Bundoran Golf Club website

Buncrana

Buncrana (/ b ʌ n. K r æ n ə /; Irish: Bun Cranncha , which means “foot of the (River) Crana”) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. It is next to Lough Swilly on Inishowenhalvön, 23 km (14 mi) northwest of Derry and 43 kilometers (27 mi) north of Letterkenny. [2] In the census of 2011, the population was 6839 [3] making it the second most populated city in County Donegal, by letter, and the largest in Inishowen.

Buncrana is the historic home of the O’Doherty clan and was originally developed around the defensive tower called O’Doherty’s stay at the mouth of the River Crana. The town was moved to its current location just south of the River Crana when George Vaughan built the main street of the 1718th

The city was a major center of the textile industry in the county Donegal from the 19th century until the mid-2000s (decade).

History

O’Doherty’s stay

On the north bank of the River Crana as it enters Lough Swilly sits three floors O’Doherty’s stay, which is the only surviving part of a 14th century Norman castle. The first two levels of the Keep was built after 1333. [4] [5] In 1601 it O’Doherty’s stay was described as a small, two-story castle, inhabited by Conor O’Doherty McGarret. 1602 the third level was added and it was upgraded by Hugh Boy O’Doherty as an intended base for Spanish military support that hoped to land at Inch. [5]

Keep burned by Crown forces in 1608 in retaliation for the uprising by Sir Cahir O’Doherty, who had looted and razed the city of Derry. After Sir Cahir O’Doherty killed vidslaget at Kilmacrennan, he attaindered and his land confiscated. Keep granted Sir Arthur Chichester, who then leased to the Englishman Henry Vaughan, where it was repaired and lived in the Vaughan family until 1718. [6]

1718 was Buncrana Castle was built by George Vaughan was one of the first large mansions built in Inishowen and stone taken from Bawn or defensive wall that surrounds O’Doherty us keep building it. It was erected on the original site of Buncrana, who had grown up in the shadow of the keep.Vaughan moved the city to its current location, where he founded the present main street and built the Castle Bridge (six arched stone single lane bridge) over the River Crana leading to his castle. [7]

During the 1798 Rebellion, Wolfe Tone was held in Buncrana Castle when he was captured by the British / French naval battle off Donegal, before they moved to Derry and then to Dublin. On 18 May 1812, Isaac Todd bought the entire town of Buncrana, even townlands of Tullydish, Adaravan and Ballymacarry the audit Chancery on behalf of the trustees of the Marquess of Donegall. His nephews inherited the castle, and they later became known as Thornton Todd. The castle is still used as a private home today. In the courtyard there is a memorial rock in honor of Sir Cahir O’Doherty, and a plaque dedicated to Wolfe Tone. [8]

When John Newton and his shipmates on The Greyhound found refuge in Lough Swilly April 8, 1748 after a devastating Atlantic storm, he saw his survival as divine intervention, the answer to prayer. The refuge of Swilly and Buncrana area as a spiritual basis of a reformed later life. In 1764 he became a Church of England priest and then as assistant pastor at Olney in Buckinghamshire, an anti-slavery activist and famous hymnist known for writing “Amazing Grace”. [9]

One of the oldest remaining occupiers in Buncrana is a Georgian property called Westbrook House, located at the entrance to Swan Park just north of the town of Buncrana. The house was built in 1807 by Judge Wilson, who also built single arch stone bridge (called the Wilson Bridge) leading to the house and the entrance to the Swan Park.

20th century

In October 1905 Buncrana was the first town in County Donegal to get electricity. It was generated at Swan Mill continued to provide electricity for the city until September 1954 when Buncrana implemented in ESB rural electrification program. [7]

On July 30, 1922 under the Irish Civil War, Buncrana was captured by Free State forces from Republican forces without loss of life. The Free State forces kept the railway station, telephone and telegraph offices and all roads into the city. At 4:00 a sentry stopped a car on the outskirts of the city and to discover it contained the Republican commander, with five armed volunteers, arrested them. At about 7:00 am the Republican forces position was surrounded and were given fifteen minutes to surrender. They are followed, arrested and their weapons and ammunition were seized. Later that day, 100 Free State troops seized a train at Buncrana station and continued to take Clonmany, Carndonagh and other places on the peninsula. [10]

Buncrana was the subject of public attention in 1972, when after Operation Motorman it became refuge for many provisional Irish Republican Army members from Derry. In 1991, a local Sinn Féin Council, Eddie Fullerton, murdered by loyalists from Northern Ireland. [11]

Policy

Local

Buncrana Town Council was communal for the city and gave a comprehensive range of services in the area. These services ranged from planning control, provision of social housing, to the maintenance and improvement of roads, maintenance of parks, beaches and open spaces. The city council was abolished in June 2014 when the Municipal Act Reform 2014genomfördes. [12] Its functions were taken over by Donegal County Council in 2014. Buncrana Inishowen located in the municipality, which chooses delegates to Donegal County Council. [13]

National

Buncrana is part of Donegal (Dáil constituency) since 2016. Earlier it was a part of Donegal Northeast constituency Dáil.

Geography

Buncrana is located on the eastern shore of Lough Swilly in northern County Donegal. The main urban area of the city lies between the Crana River in the north and the Mill River in the south. Principle street is a rough north-south route and is divided into upper and lower Main Street from Market Square.Main Street has a one-way traffic system. Crana River is crossed by three bridges: Castlebridge (providing vehicular access to Buncrana Castle and pedestrian access to the Swan Park), Westbrook Bridge (officially, Wilson’s Bridge) and the Cock Hill Bridge. Mill River, south of the city, crossed by two bridges: Victoria Bridge (known locally as the Iron Bridge), which is the main point of access to the city and the Mill Bridge is at the end of Mill Brae Road at the southern end of town.

Geology

The bedrock contains Fahan shale formation. River Valley in Mill River flows over a narrow band of Culdaff limestone with a threshold of metadolerite along rivers southern dike stretching from estuarine zone inland. Sandy gravel and clonglomerates overlying bedrock. The geology was formed in the Lower Carboniferous period. The local soils throughout the area ranging from shallow to moderate depth of peat podzols and established podzolics types with a moderate proportion of loam and sandy clays.

Climate

Buncrana, like the rest of Ireland, has a temperate oceanic climate, or Cfb on the Köppen climate classification system, which is characterized by cool summers and mild winters. [14] Ireland in the Atlantic means that its climate is strongly influenced by the Gulf Stream, which keeps it a few degrees warmer than other places on the same latitude.

These are average temperatures and rainfall figures between 1961 and 1990, taken at the Met Éireann weather station at Malin Head, about 35 kilometers (22 mi) northwest of Buncrana:

Transport

Buncrana station opened September 9, 1864 was closed for passenger September 6, 1948 and finally closed completely 10 August 1953. [16]

The nearest railway station is run by Northern Ireland Railways and runs from Londonderry train station via Coleraine to Belfast Central Station and Belfast Great Victoria Street Railway Station. The strategic Belfast-Derry railway line is to be upgraded to facilitate more frequent trains and improvements of the permanent way track and signaling to allow faster services. [17]

Buncrana is connected to the rest of the national road network via a regional road, the R238. This connects to the N13, the national main guiding connecting Letterkenny and Derry (it becomes A2 when it crosses the border). The city is considered the gateway to Inishowen and is located at “Inishowen 100 ‘, an approximate 100 mil way around the peninsula passing various scenic spots.

Local bus company McGonagle bus runs an hourly bus from Derry to Buncrana and vice versa. The company took over the road from Lough Swilly buses in April 2014 after Lough Swilly ceased operations. [18] [19] The buses run every hour at ten minutes past the hour, each way. schedule http://www.mcgonaglebushire.com/time-table/

Demography

Buncrana Compared [20]
2011 Irish Census Buncrana County Donegal Republic of Ireland
total population 6839 161137 4581269
Foreign-Born 28.8% 22.1% 16.9%
White or white Irish 86,5% 90.6% 84.5%
Black or Black Irish 0.3% 0.6% 1.4%
Asian or Asian Irish 0.6% 0.8% 1.9%
Roman Catholic 90.9% 85.4% 84.3%
No religion 4.1% 3.2% 5.9%
The ability to speak Irish 30,0% 38.4% 40.6%
Third level degree (NFQ Level 7 or higher) 19,0% 18.2% 20.5%

The results of the 2011 census put the population Ireland Buncrana on the 6839th The city had 2,531 households, 25.3% consists of one person living alone, 16.9% were couples without children, 34.9% were couples with children, 15, 6% were single parents, and 7.2% were classified as “other”.

Approximately 90.9% of residents registered as Catholic, 4.3% were of another religion reported (eg Church of Ireland, Presbyterian, Orthodox or Islam). The percentage of people with no religion was 4.1%.

28.8% of the city’s residents were “foreign-born”.

People aged 3 and over, 30.0% were able to speak Irish.

The proportion of people over the age of 15, whose full-time education had ceased possessed a third level qualification (NFQ level 7 or higher) was 19.0%.

There were 3,359 males and 3,480 females in Buncrana during the census of 2011.

Tourism

Buncrana has a relatively strong tourism industry, and it is one of the most popular resorts in the North West of Ireland. This is possibly because of its proximity to Derry, and also for its wide range of shops. It also has well-developed tourist facilities, and it serves as the main town on the Inishowen Peninsula, which also helps to maintain the tourism industry in the city. [21]

Lisfannon beach, a blue flag beach, located on the shores of Lough Swilly just south of town, and is an important recreational beach that is popular with locals ochdagsresenärer from Derry. [22]

Sports

Buncrana is home to many sports clubs, including clubs for football, Gaelic football and hurling, athletics and vattensporter.Fotbollsklubbar built around Buncrana include Buncrana Hearts FC, Cock Hill Celtic FC and Celtic Illies. Buncrana Hearts and Illies Celtic play in Inishowen Football League and Cock Hill Celtic play in the Ulster Senior League.

Gaelic football is also a popular sport in Buncrana, and the club caters to teams from Under-8 level all the way up to the executive level. They play their home games at Scarvey, the team is vey successful minor, to win at least two titles Inishowen recent seasons and winning four county championship since 2000 and reached the under-14 final for the past two seasons as well as under 15 years last season.

Buncrana Golf Club is the oldest 9-hole links course in Ireland. [23]

Culture

Three buildings in Buncrana recorded on the record of Protected Structures, namely Drift Inn (formerly Buncrana station), Buncrana Castle and Swan Mill. [24]

Music

Buncrana has a vibrant music scene, with a variety of local pubs and bars with live music most nights of the week. Roddens Bar, O Flaherty and The Drift Inn is always good for a mix of traditional, rock and country. The annual Buncrana Music & Arts Festival takes place every July 23 in the city. [25]

The Buncrana Music and Arts Festival returned to the city in 2010, after an absence of five years. The festival included successful performances from the Coronas, undertones ochAltan. It has returned every year since.

Buncrana is also known for producing traditional artists. Dinny McLaughlin, Paul McClure, Ciaran tourish and Tom Byrne, all natives of the city, and has performed for criticism across the country.

Media

The two main local newspapers that serve the Inishowen area, the Inish Times and Inishowen Independent , have their offices in Buncrana. Local issues in town and the peninsula are also covered in the Derry Journal . The local radio station Highland Radio and is based in Letterkenny.

Buncrana receive all the Irish national television and radio from Saorview television network from the local Fanad TV transmitter. Because of its proximity to Derry / Londonderry, before the 2012 digital broadcasting, the city can get the five main UK TV channels from Londonderry, Limavady TV stations since the mid-1950s.

Community

tidy Towns

In 2012 Buncrana won a silver medal in the national Tidy Towns Competition. Work in Buncrana Lighthouse Restoration Project was also recognized when they received a heritage award. [26]

youth Offices

Buncrana Youth Club is open seven days a week and offers various services such as art, sports, drama, music and computers. It also operates summer camps and provides coaching, personal development and peer education. [27]

Buncrana Youth Drop-in is located at the Plaza theater on Main Street and is usually open from 07:00 til 10:00 and provides a safe place for young people with such facilities as a pool table, internet access, television, game consoles and a small shop. It also runs workshops and other youth projects. [28]

Buncrana Youth Club and Buncrana Drop in both connected with Donegal service.

Breakout is a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth organization in County Donegal which has a local group in Buncrana. The group is open to ages 14 to 23. The group has run various projects to promote LGBT causes in Buncrana. In 2011, positive slogans to fight homophobia drawn on Main Street walkway. The group meets on the Inishowen Development Partnership builds on Saturdays 7:00 to 21:00.

Training

Buncrana served by three high schools: Crana College, a vocational school managed by the Donegal Education Board and Scoil Mhuire, a voluntary secondary school under the trusteeship of CEIST (Catholic Education Irish Schools Trust) and Coláiste Chineal Eoghain (an Irish secondary school in Tullyarvan Mill). Crana College was set up in 1925, while Scoil Mhuire was developed in 1933. [29] In September 2011, the Crana College 540 [30] registered students, while Scoil Mhuire had about 700. [31] The city’s most important schools are Scoil Íosagáin and Cock Hill National School. Other smaller schools include St Mura National School and Gaelscoil Bhun Chrannacha.[32]

Buncrana Community Library opened in 2000 in a renovated Presbyterian church. It won the Public Library Building Awards 2001 for best small library in the converted, extended or renovated category. [33]

People

  • Ryan Bradley (Gaelic footballer), (1985-Present), 2012 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship winner with Donegal
  • Daniel Devlin (1814 – February 22, 1867), prosperous businessman and the city of Chamberlain in New York City
  • Hugh Doherty (footballer) (1921 – September 29 2014), Irish professional footballer (Celtic FC, Blackpool, Derry City FC, Dundalk)
  • John Doherty (1798-1854), radical union
  • Eddie Fullerton, (1935-25 May 1991), Sinn Féin councilor murdered by the Ulster Defence Association
  • Danny Hutton (born 10 September 1942), singer with Three Dog Night and head of the Hanna-Barbera Records 1965-1966
  • Pádraig Mac Lochlainn, politicians
  • Ray McAnally, (March 30, 1926 to June 15, 1989), an actor whose filmography includes The Mission , My Left Foot , and a very British Coup
  • Michael McCorkell, (3 May 1925-13 November 2006), Lord Lieutenant of County Londonderry
  • Frank McGuinness (born July 29, 1953), playwright and poet whose work included Note the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme
  • Patrick Stone, (14 March 1854-23 December 1926), a member of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly

Castle Bridge over the River Crana as it flows into Lough Swilly

International relations

Main article: List of twin town in Ireland

Twin towns – Sister cities

Buncrana is twinned with two towns. It is twinned with Campbell, Kentucky, both cities had a big Fruit of the Loom plant. The facility was a major source of employment in Buncrana before it moved its operations abroad to Morocco. [34] Buncrana is twinned with the following cities:

City geographical location Nation Since
Campbell Kentucky  USA 1991
Frehel / Plévenon Brittany  France 2007

See also

  • List of populated places in Ireland
  • Buncrana Hearts FC
  • List of RNLI stations

References

  1. Jump up ^ http://www.cso.ie/census and www.histpop.org. Post 1961 figures include the surroundings of Buncrana. For a discussion of the accuracy of pre-svältfolkräknings return see JJ Lee “On the accuracy of pre-famine Irish bills” in the Irish population, economy and society, edited by JM Gold Strom and LA Clarkson (1981) P54 and even “New developments in the Irish population history , 1700-1850 “by Joel Mokyr and Cormac Ó GRADA in the Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 37, No. 4 (November, 1984), p. 473-488.
  2. Jump up ^ “Town information: location”. buncrana.com. Hämtad15 October 2011.
  3. Jump up ^ “legal Buncrana town and its surroundings Co Donegal”.Central Statistics Office. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  4. Jump up ^ Archer, Lucy; Edwin Smith (1999). Architecture in the UK and Ireland, 600-1500. Harvill Press. ISBN 978-1-86046-701-1.
  5. ^ Jump up to: ab . Harbison, Peter (1975) Guide to the national monuments in Ireland .Gill & Macmillan.
  6. Jump up ^ Lewis, Samuel; Edwin Smith (1837). A topological Dictionary of Ireland vol.1.
  7. ^ Jump up to: ab “chronology of local history”. Buncrana Town Council (visitbuncrana.com). Retrieved 14 October 2011.
  8. Jump up ^ “Local History”. Buncrana Town Council (visitbuncrana.com) .Hämtad 14 October 2011.
  9. Jump up ^ “John Newton and Lough Swilly.” amazinggrace.ie.Hämtad14 October 2011.
  10. Jump up ^ “rebels routed in Donegal towns, Free State Troops Capture garments risons on Letterkenney, Buncrana and Cardonagh ENDS BRIGANDAGE THE Raiders had terrorized the District of weeks, often hold up the train.”. The New York Times. July 1, 1922.
  11. Jump up ^ “Eddie Fullerton murder probe”. Derry Journal. Hämtad13 October 2011.
  12. Jump up ^http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/pdf/2014/en.act.2014.0001.pdf
  13. Jump up ^ “Councillors of the Municipality Inishowen.” Donegal County Council. March 3, 2016.
  14. Jump up ^ Peel, MC; Finlayson BL; McMahon, TA (2007). “Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification.” Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 11 :. 1633-1644 doi: 10.5194 / hess-11-1633-2007. ISSN 1027-5606. (Direct: Final revised papers)
  15. Jump up ^ “Malin Head, monthly and annual averages (1961-1990)”.Met Éireann. Retrieved 13 October 2011.
  16. Jump up ^ “Buncrana station” (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways.Hämtad13 September of 2007.
  17. Jump up ^ McDaid, Brendan (9 November 2011). “Derry railway upgrade on the right track.” The Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 15 February 2012.
  18. Jump up ^ “Buncrana Derry bus timetable -“.
  19. Jump up ^ “UPDATE: Ulsterbus to earn Muff-Derry route”.
  20. Jump up ^ “2011 results, Area Population Maps (SAPMAP) Small” .Www.cso.ie. Central Statistics Office. Retrieved April 26, 2015.
  21. Jump up ^ Team Travel City Guide. “Buncrana Guide – Buncrana tourism and travel”.
  22. Jump up ^ “awarded places: Lisfannon beach”. blueflag.org. Hämtad14 October 2011.
  23. Jump up ^http://www.golfinginireland.ie/clubs_courses/donegal/buncranna.htm
  24. Jump up ^ “Appendix 5 Environmental respect Buncrana & Environs Development Plan 2008- 2015” (PDF). Buncrana and Environs Development Plan 2008-2014. Donegal County Council. Hämtad28 October 2011.
  25. Jump up ^ “MrBuncrana Jamestown Festival – Facebook”.
  26. Jump up ^ “sparkles in Buncrana Tidy Town Awards”. Inishowen News.11 September 2012. Retrieved 20 March 2013.
  27. Jump up ^ “Buncrana Youth Club”. Donegal Youth Service. Taken 20 mars2013.
  28. Jump up ^ “Buncrana Youth Drop In”. Donegal Youth Service.Hämtad20 March 2013.
  29. Jump up ^ “Scoil Mhuire secondary school, Buncrana.” CEIST.Hämtad20 October 2011.
  30. Jump up ^ “A Brief History”. Crana College. Taken 20 August oktober2011.
  31. Jump up ^ “About the school”. Scoil Mhuire, Buncrana. Retrieved 20 December 2011.
  32. Jump up ^ “Information Education”. Buncrana Town Council (buncrana.com) .Hämtad 21 October 2011.
  33. Jump up ^ “Buncrana Community Library”. librarybuildings.ie.Hämtad8 November 2011.
  34. Jump up ^ Deegan, Gordon (25 October 2010). “Morocco transmission eating the Fruit of the Loom profits”. Irish Independent. Retrieved 13 August oktober2011.

The Blue Stack Mountains

The Blue Stack Mountains [1] or the Blues Mountains , also calledCroaghgorms (Irish: na Cruacha Rants , meaning “blue bars”), is the largest mountain range in south County Donegal, Ireland. They provide a barrier between the southern part of the county, such as Donegal Town and Ballyshannon and cities in the north and west as Dungloe and Letterkenny.The road between the two parts of the county goes through Barnes Gap.

The highest mountain in the area is Croaghgorm, which is 674 meters high.Nearby summits include Ardnageer (642 m), Croaghanirwore (548 m), Croaghbarnes (499 m), Croaghblane (641 m), Croaghnageer (571 m), Croveenananta (476 m), Gaugin Mountain (565 m), Lacroagh ( 403 m), more Lavagh (671 m) and Lavagh Beg (650 m). [2]

References 

  1. Jump up ^ Blue Stack Mountains placental Database of Ireland.Retrieved: 3/19/2013
  2. Jump up ^ Croaghgorm mountainviews. Pulled: 03/19/2013.

Arranmore

Árainn Mhor (English name: Arranmore ) [1] [2] is an island off the west coast of County Donegal, Ireland. Arranmore is the largest inhabited island in County Donegal, with a population of 514 in 2011, down from 528 in 2006, 543 in 2002 and over 600 in 1996. The island is part of the Donegal Gaeltacht.

It is also known in English as the Aran Island (not to be confused with the Aran Islands off Galway Bay or the Scottish Isle of Arran). In the island of Ireland traditionally called Árainn ; adjective Mór (great) was added fairly recently. It was also sometimes known as Irish Árainn Uí Dhomhnaill , that is, “Aran of O’Donnell”.

Irish

There are 529 people living on Aranmore and 62% are native Irish speakers.

Place

The island is located 5 km (3 mi) from Burton, a small coastal village in the Rosses, and is served by two ferry services, a conventional ferry that accommodates up to 96 feet passengers and all sizes of vehicles. This trip takes 15 minutes. In 2007, a fast ferry service that can cover the journey to the island in 5 minutes. Both services run daily throughout the year. The trip to the island of passing a number of small islands before crossing a stretch of open Atlantic waters.

Habitation

Most of the population lives along the south and the (relatively protected) east coast, where the main village, Leabgarrow (Irish: Leadhb Gharbh ) is located. The island has been inhabited since the “pre-Celtic times,” and the few remaining signs of early settlement include a promontory fort to the south of the island and shell middens dotted along the beaches. Its location near the Atlantic shipping lanes used, with a Coast Guard station and a fyrplacerad in the most north-westerly point, and a 2nd World War surveillance after set up to look out for the U-boats. [ Citation needed ]

The resident population is 650, but it rises to over 1,000 during the summer months. A large part of the housing stock are second homes, both native islanders and their descendants, as well as non locals.

Infrastructure and Economy

The island was the first offshore island of Ireland to get electricity from the rural electrification program, run by the ESB, in 1957, but was among the last places in the country to have universally reliable tap (in 1973-1975) and an automatic telephone exchange (1986). It went straight from a manual transmission to an ISDN-enabled system that need to be upgraded within a few weeks because of the massive demand for consumer telephone lines, as the previous exchange had been limited to issuing numbers to business projects, and only had 47 internal lines.

It is based primarily on tourism for their income (fishing was the island’s mainstay up to the 1980s, but is no longer a major industry), as well as the traditional Gaeltacht summer schools. In recent years, a local development co-op has encouraged the development of other industries on the island, such as a call center and teacher training for Irish teachers. The island’s many lakes provide fishing rod.

Arranmore transmitter

The Arranmore Island transmitter is a relay station used by 2RN and Highland Radio to provide coverage to the island and a large part of the Rosses protected by mountains from the main broadcasting. Two towers are, the less belonging to Highland Radio, and significantly larger to 2RN. The EIRP of the stations that broadcast of 2RN is among the highest of all relästation.Webbplatsen is 125 meters above sea level, with 2RN antenna is 45 meters.

A 1 kW transmitter on 104.0 MHz, have been proposed for i102-104FM radio station launched in February 2008. Both O2 Ireland, Vodafone Ireland, the transmitting stations on 2RN mast.

UHF 45 assigned but unused by TV3. 41, 44, 47 and 51 are assigned for digital terrestrial television.

Other

The island is “twinned” with the Beaver Island, an island in northern Lake Michigan, where a large number of former residents gathered after being evicted from Arranmore in the mid-1800s. There is still today a number of families on Beaver Island which has its basis in Arranmore. [3]

The Arranmore RNLI Station, with its Severn class lifeboat, is among the best equipped in the county.

Places and villages on Arranmore Island

  • Aphort
  • Plohogue
  • Fallagowan
  • Ballintra
  • Ballard
  • illion
  • Leabgarrow (main settlement)
  • Leabrannagh
  • Pollawaddy
  • Scraigatoke
  • Torries

See also

  • Lighthouses in Ireland
  • List of RNLI stations
  • ulster Irish
  • eighter Island
  • Inishcoo
  • Rutland Island

References

  1. Jump up ^ placenta (Ceantair Ghaeltachta) Order 2004
  2. Jump up ^ As for the meaning of the name, see Deirdre and Laurence Flanagan, Irish place names , Gill & Macmillan, 2002.
  3. Jump up ^ http://www.beaverbeacon.com/2003-03-March/The_Way_it_was_The_Arranmore_Connection.html

County Donegal

County Donegal (pronounced / d ʌ n ᵻ ɡ ɔ l / or / ˌ d ʌ n ᵻ ɡ ɔ l /; Irish: Contae Dhun na nGall ) is a municipality in Ireland. It’s part of the border area and in the province of Ulster .It is named after the town of Donegal ( Dun Na nGall ) in the southern part of the county. Donegal County Council is the local authority for the county and Lifford serves as the county seat. The population of the county is 161,137 according to the census of 2011. It has also been known as (county) Tyrconnell ( Tír Chonaill ), after the historic territory of the same name.

Geography and political subdivisions

In terms of size and range, is the largest county in Ulster and the fourth largest county in all of Ireland. Unique County Donegal shares a small border with only one other county in Ireland -County Leitrim. Most of its land border shared with three counties in Northern Ireland, County Londonderry, County Tyrone and County Fermanagh. This geographical isolation from the rest of the Republic has led to Donegal people maintain a distinct cultural identity [5] and has been used to market the county with the slogan “Up here it’s different.” [6] Although Lifford is the county town, Letterkenny is it in by far the largest city in the county with a population of 19,588. Letter and the nearby city of Derry is the main economic axis of the northwest of Ireland. [7]In fact, what was the city of Derry was officially part of County Donegal until 1610. [8]

baronies

Poison Glen ( Gleann Nimhe ), in the North West Donegal.

There are eight historic baronies in the county:

  • Banagh
  • Boylagh
  • Inishowen East
  • Inishowen West
  • Kilmacrennan
  • Raphoe North
  • Raphoe South
  • Tirhugh

Informal districts

The county can be informally divided into a number of traditional districts.There are two Gaeltacht districts in the West: The Rosses (Irish: Na Rosa ), centered on the town of Dungloe (Irish: An Clochán Liath ) and Gweedore (Irish: Gaoth Dobhair ). Another Gaeltacht districts located in the northwest: Cloughaneely (Irish: Cloich Chionnaola ) centered on the town of Falcarragh (Irish: A fal Carrach ). The northernmost part of the island of Ireland is the location of the three peninsulas of outstanding natural beauty: Inishowen, Fanad and Rosguill. The main urban area of Inishowen, Ireland’s largest peninsula, is Buncrana. In the eastern part of the county is Finn Valley (centered on Ballybofey). The Laggan district (not to be confused with the more famous Lagan Valley in the southern county Antrim) is centered on the town of Raphoe.

Seen from space: County Donegal in the Ulster coast of Lough Swillyoch Inishowen west of Derry ochDerry Lough Foyle east thereof.

Demography

According to the 1841 census, County Donegal had a population of 296,000 people. As a result of starvation and emigration, the population had fallen to 41,000 by 1851 and further decreased by 18 thousand in 1861. At the time of the 1951 census, the population was only 44% of what it had been in 1841. [15] The 2006 Census, which conducted by the State statistical Office, had County Donegal population stands at 147,264. According to the 2011 census, the county’s population had grown to 161,137.

Largest cities (2011 census)

City Population (2011 Census)
Letter 19588
Buncrana 7199
Ballybofey / Stranorlar 4852
Donegal Town 2607
Carndonagh 2534
Shannon 2504
Bundoran 2140
Lifford 1658
Bunbeg / Derrybeg 1553
Milford 1530
Moville 1481
Convoy 1438
Killybegs 1297
Sleeve 1271
Ramelton 1212
Dungloe 1183
Raphoe 1157
Newtowncunningham 1067

physical geography

The county is the most mountainous in Ulster consists mainly of two series of low mountains; Derryveagh the mountains to the north and the Blues Mountains in the south, medGallaghers at 749 meters (2,457 ft), the highest peak. It has a deeply indented coastline forming natural sea loughs, both of which Lough Swilly ochLough Foyle is the most remarkable. The Slieve League cliffs are the sixth highest sea cliffs in Europe, while Malin Head is the most northerly point on the island of Ireland.

The climate is temperate and dominated by the Gulf Stream, with hot, humid summers and mild wet winters. Two permanently inhabited islands, Arranmore and Tory Island, located off the coast, along with a large number of islands with only transient inhabitants. Ireland’s second longest river Erne, go Donegal Bay near the town of Ballycastle. The River Erne, together with other Donegal streams have been dammed to produce hydroelectric power.The River Foyle separates a part of County Donegal from parts of the two counties of Londonderry and Tyrone.

Botany

A survey of the macroscopic marine algae of County Donegal was published in 2003. [16] The survey was compiled with the help of algae quotations in herbaria of the following institutions: the Ulster Museum, Belfast, Trinity College, National University of Ireland, Galway, and the Natural History Museum, London . Directory of flowering plants include: Dactylorhiza purple. (Stephenson and Stephenson) SOO [17]

Zoology

The animals included in the county include Badgers ( Meles meles L.) [18]

There are habitats for rare corncrake in the county. [19]

History

Kilclooney Dolmen, which is over 4000 years old. [20]

At different times in history it has been known as County Tirconaill , County Tirconnell or County Tyrconnell (Irish: Tír Chonaill ). The former was used as the official name during 1922-1927. [21] It is with reference to both the old Tuath of Tír Chonaill and county which succeeded it.

County Donegal is famous for being the home of the once mighty Clann Dálaigh, whose most famous branch was Clann Ó Domhnaill, better known in English as the O’Donnell clan. Until about 1600, the O’Donnell was one of Ireland’s richest and most powerful Gaelic (Irish native) ruling families. In the province of Ulster endastClann Uí Neill (known in English as O’Neill Clan) of modern County Tyrone was more powerful. The O’Donnell was Ulster’s second most powerful clan or ruling family from the early 13th century until the early 17th century. For centuries O’Donnell ruled Tír Chonaill, a Gaelic kingdom in West Ulster, covering almost all modern County Donegal. The head of the O’Donnell family had the titles An O Domhnaill (ie the O’Donnellin English) and Rí Thir Chonaill (meaning King of Tír Chonaill in English).Based on Donegal Castle in Dun Na nGall (contemporary Donegal Town), the O’Donnell Kings of Tír Chonaill traditionally inaugurated on Doon Rock near Kilmacrenan. O’Donnell royal or main power finally ended in the then newly created County Donegal in September 1607, after the Flight of the Earls from Rathmullan close. The modern County Arms in Donegal (dating from the early 1970s) was influenced by the design of the old O’Donnell riksvapnet. The County Arms is the official coat of arms of both the County Donegal and Donegal County Council.

The modern County Donegal was shired [22] by order of the English Crown in 1585. The English authorities in Dublin Castle formed the new county by merging the old Kingdom of Tír Chonaill with the old dominion Inishowen.But the English authorities could not establish control over Tír Chonaill and Inishowen until after the Battle of Kinsale in 1602. Full control of the new County Donegal achieved only after the Flight of the Earls in September 1607. It was the center of O ‘Doherty’ Revolt of 1608 with key battle Kilmacrennan take place there. The county was one of those “planted” during the Plantation of Ulster from about 1610 onwards. What was the City of Derry was officially part of County Donegal until 1610. [8]

County Donegal was one of the worst affected parts of Ulster during the great famine in the late 1840s in Ireland. Large parts of the county was devastated by this disaster, many areas are permanently depopulated. Large number of County Donegal people emigrated at this time, primarily through Londonderry Port.

The partition of Ireland in the early 1920s had a massive direct impact on the County Donegal. Partition cut the county of financial and administrative, of Derry, who had acted for centuries as the county’s largest port, transportation hub and financial center. Derry, along with West Tyrone, was now in a new, different permissions officially called Northern Ireland.Partition also meant that the County Donegal was now almost cut off from the rest of the jurisdiction where it was now, the new empire called the Irish Free State, which in April 1949 became Ireland. Just a few miles from the county are physically connected by land to the rest of the Republic. The existence of a border Donegal cut off from its natural hinterland in Derry City and West Tyrone significantly worsen the economic difficulties in the county after the partition. The county’s economy is particularly sensitive, like in Derry, currency fluctuations in the euro against the pound.

Added to this, in the late 20th century, County Donegal has been negatively affected by the Troubles in Northern Ireland. The county suffered several bombings and assassinations. In June 1987 Constable Samuel McClean, a Donegal man who was a serving member of the Royal Ulster Constabulary, was shot dead by the Provisional Irish Republican Army at his family home near Drumkeen. In May 1991, the prominent Sinn Féin politician councilor Eddie Fullerton was killed by the Ulster Defence Association at his home in Buncrana. This added to the result of the economic and social difficulties in the county. The greater the economic and administrative integration following the Good Friday Agreement of April 1998 has been of benefit to the county.

It has been labeled “forgotten county’s own politicians, because of the perception that it is ignored by the Irish government, even in times of crisis.[23] [24]

Irish

Road signs in Irish in GweedoreGaeltacht.

A large part of the county is seen as a bastion of Gaelic culture and the Irish, Donegal Gaeltacht is the second largest in the country. The version of the Irish language spoken in County Donegal Ulster Irish.

Of the Gaeltacht population of 24,744, [1] 16% of the county’s total of 17,132 say they can speak Irish. [25] There are three Irish-speaking congregations: Gweedore, The Rosses and Cloughaneely .Other Irish-speaking Gaeltacht areas is a den: Glencolmcille, Fanad and Rosguill, islands Aranmore, Tory Island and Inishbofin. Gweedore is the largest Irish-speaking parish, with over 5,000 inhabitants. All schools in the region use the Irish language as the language of instruction. One of the constituent colleges of the NUI Galway, Acadamh hOllscolaíochta na Gaeilge, is based in Gweedore.

There are 1,005 students in five Gaelscoileanna and two Gaelcholáistí in the rest of the county. According to the 2006 census, there are also 7.218 people who identify as daily Irish speakers outside the Gaeltacht in the rest of the county.

Government and politics

Donegal County Council (which has officially existed since 1899) are responsible for local administration, and headquartered in the County House in Lifford. Until 2014 there were also local iLetter, Bundoran, Ballyshannon and Buncrana. The city council was abolished in June 2014 when the law municipal reform in 2014 were carried out [26] and their functions taken over by Donegal County Council.Val to the county council takes place every five years. Thirty seven is elected by the system of Proportional representation -Single transferable vote (STV). To valence region is divided into 5kommundelar comprising the following local electoral areas: Donegal (6), Glenties (6), Inishowen (9), Letter (10) and Stranorlar (6).

For the general election, county-wide constituency choose five representatives to the Dáil. For the European elections, the county is part of the Midlands North West constituency.

Voters have a reputation nationally for being “conservative and contrarian”, the county has achieved prominence for having rejected the Fiscal Treaty in 2012 and both the Lisbon Treaty vote. [27]

free Donegal

Freedom of Donegal is an award given to individuals who have been recognized for outstanding achievements on behalf of the people and County Donegal. Such people inkluderarDaniel O ‘Donnell, Phil Coulter, Shay Given, Packie Bonner, Paddy Crerand and the Brennan family. In 2009, members of the 28th Infantry Battalion of the Irish Defence Forces was also awarded the Freedom of the County of Donegal County Council “in recognition of his longstanding service to County Donegal.”

access

An extensive rail network that used to exist in the whole county and mainly driven by the County Donegal Railways Joint Committee and Londonderry and Lough Swilly Railway Company (known as L & LSR or Lough Swilly Company for short). Unfortunately, all these lines were added to a 3-foot gauge where the connection lines were all that the Irish standard track gauge of 1600 mm (5 ft 3 in). This meant that all goods must be reloaded in Derry and Strabane. Like all narrow gauge railways this became a big handicap after World War 1 when the road began to seriously erode the rail freight traffic. By 1953 Lough Swilly had closed its entire railway system and become a bus and road transport concerns. The County Donegal lasted until 1960 as it had largely dieselised its passenger trains in 1951. In the late 1950s, more work needed to upgrade the track and the Irish government was unwilling to provide the necessary funds, so-called Wee Donegal ” because it was affectionally known, was closed in 1960. Great Northern Railway (Ireland) Ltd (GNR) also ran a line from Strabane by the Laggan, a district in the eastern part of the county, along the river Foyle in Derry. But the rail network in County Donegal was completely closed by 1960. [28] Today, the nearest railway station to the county’s Waterside Station in the city of Derry, operated by Northern Ireland Railways (NIR). Train services along the Belfast-Derry railway line running through Coleraine, Belfast to Belfast Central and Great Victoria Street.

County Donegal served by both Donegal Airport, located at Carrickfinn in The Rosses in the western part of the county and City of Derry Airport, located on Eglinton east. The nearest major international airport to the county is Belfast International Airport (popularly known as Aldergrove Airport), located in the east at Aldergrove, near Antrim Town, Co. Antrim, 92 km (57 mi) from Derry City and 127 kilometers (79 mi) from Letter.

Culture

The variant of the Irish language spoken in Donegal shares many features with Scottish. The Irish spoken in the Donegal Gaeltacht (Irish speaking area) is the Ulster dialect, while Inishowen (parts of which became the only English in the early 20th century) used the East Ulster dialect. Ulster Scots is spoken frequently in both the Finn Valley and The Laggan’s East Donegal.Donegal Irish has a strong influence on learning Irish of Ulster.

Like other areas on the west coast of Ireland, Donegal has a distinctive fiddle tradition that is world famous. Donegal is also known for his songs that have, like instrumental music, a distinctive sound. Donegal artists such as band Clannad, The Patterson and Altan and solo artist Enya, has had international success with traditional or traditional flavored music. Donegal music has also influenced people not originally from the county, including folk and pop singer Paul Brady and Phil Coulter. Singer Daniel O’Donnell has become a popular ambassador for the county. Popular music is also common, the county’s most celebrated rock artist to be Bally -born Rory Gallagher. Other notable acts to come out of Donegal include folk-rock band goats not Straight, Eurovision contestant Mickey Joe Harte and indie rock band The Revs and in recent years bands like the thousands and Mojo Gogo has been featured on the front of Hot Press magazine.

Donegal has a long literary tradition in both Irish and English. The famous Irish navvies -turned-writer Patrick MacGill, author of many books about the experiences of Irish immigrant itinerant workers in the UK at around the beginning of the 20s, such as The Rat Pit and autobiographical Children of the Dead End , is from the Glenties area . It is a literary Summer School in Glenties named in his honor. The novelist and socialist politikerPeadar O’Donnell came from The Rosses in West Donegal. The poet William Allingham was also from Bally. Modern exponents include Inishowen playwright and poet Frank McGuinness and playwright Brian Friel. Many of Friel plays set in the fictional Donegal town of Ballybeg.

Author Donegal has created works, as the Annals of the Four Masters , in Gaelic and Latin since the early Middle Ages. The Irish philosopher John Toland was born in Inishowen in 1670. He was thought of as the original thinker George Berkeley. Toland was also instrumental in the spread of Freemasonry throughout the continent. In modern Irish Donegal has produced famous, and sometimes controversial, authors as the brothers Séamus Ó Grianna and Seosamh Mac Grianna from The Rosses and contemporary (and controversial) Irish language poet Cathal Ó Searcaigh from Gortahork in Cloughaneely and where he is known to locals as Guru na gCnoc ( “Guru of the Hills”).

Donegal is famous for its beautiful textiles, whose unique wool blends are made of short filaments with tiny bits of color mixed in a heathered effect.Sometimes it is woven in a rustic herringbone format and other times in more of a box fabric of various colors. These fabrics called Donegal tweed (with a small “d”) and is world famous.

Although approximately 85% of the population is Roman Catholic, [ citation needed ] County Donegal also has a significant Protestant minority. Many Donegal Protestants trace their ancestors to the settlers who arrived during the Plantation of Ulster in the early 17th century. The Church of Ireland is the largest Protestant denomination but is closely rivaled by a large number of Presbyterians. The areas of Donegal with the highest percentage of Protestants is Laggan area of East Donegal around Raphoe, the Finn Valley and areas around Ramelton, Milford and Dunfanaghy – where their share reach 30-45 percent. There is also a large Protestant population between Donegal Town and Ballyshannon in the southern part of the county. In absolute terms, Letter has the largest number of Protestants (over 1000) and is the most Presbyterian city (among these settlements with more than 3000 people) in Ireland. [ Citation needed ]

The Earagail Arts Festival held in the county each July.

People from Donegal have also contributed to the culture elsewhere. Francis Alison was one of the founders of the College of Philadelphia , who would later become the University of Pennsylvania. [30] Francis Makemie (originally from Ramelton) founded the Presbyterian Church in America.David Steele, from Upper Creevaugh, was a prominent Reformed Presbyterian ellerCovenanter, the minister who emigrated to the US in 1824. Right Reverend Dr. Charles Inglis, who was the first Church of England bishop of the diocese of Nova Scotia, was the third son of the Reverend Archibald Inglis, the Rector of Glencolumbkille.

Tourist attractions

County Donegal is a favored destination for many travelers. [ Citation needed ] One of the attractions is the Glenveagh National Park (formerly part of Glenveagh Estate), yet (March 2012) the only official national parksomewhere in the province of Ulster. [ Citation needed ] park is a 140 sq km (about 35,000 acres) nature reserve with landscapes of mountains, raised bogs, lakes and forests. At its heart is Glenveagh Castle, a late Victorian “folly” which was originally built as a summer residence.

Fintown Railway on track avCounty Donegal Railways Joint Committee bredvidLough Finn Fintown near the railway station.

Donegal Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking district) also attracts young people to County Donegal each year during the school summer holidays. The three-week long summer Gaeltacht courses give young Irish people from other parts of the country a chance to learn the Irish language and traditional Irish cultural traditions that are still prevalent in parts of Donegal. Donegal Gaeltacht has traditionally been a very popular destination every summer for young people from Northern Ireland. [ Citation needed ] Diving is also very popular with a club located in Donegal Town.

Training

Doctoral education in the county is provided by Letterkenny Institute of Technology (LYIT, popularly known locally as “the regional), established in the 1970s in Letterkenny. In addition, many young people from the county attend third-level institutions elsewhere in Ireland, particularly in Derry and also at the University of Ulster in Coleraine (UUC), the University of Ulster in Jordan (UUJ), Queen University of Belfast ( “Queen” ), and NUI Galway. Many Donegal students also participate Limavady Campus of the North West Regional College (popularly known Limavady Tech) ochOmagh Campus Southwest College (popularly known as Tech Omagh Omagh College).

Sports

Gweedore GAA grounds.

Gaelic football and hurling

The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) sport of Gaelic football is very popular in County Donegal. Donegal inter-county football team has won the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship title twice (1992 and 2012).Donegal victorious from the 2012 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final September 23, 2012 to take Sam Maguire Cup for only the second time, with early goals from Michael Murphy and Colm McFadden set up victory 2-11 to 0-13 of Mayo. In 2007, Donegal just won their second national title by winning the National Football League. On April 24, 2011 Donegal added his third national title when they defeated Laois capturing the National Football League Division Two. There are 16 clubs in the Football Championship Donegal senior, with many others who play at a lower level. [31]

Hurling (often referred to as “Hurley” in County Donegal), handball and rounders played well but is less widespread as in other parts of western Ulster. Donegal county senior hurling team won the Lory Meagher Cup 2011 and Nicky Rackard Cup 2013

Rugby Union

There are several rugby teams in the county. These include Ulster Qualifying League Two side Letterkenny RFC, whose land is named after Dave Gallaher, captain of the 1905 New Zealand All Blacks touring team, which has since become known as the originals. He was born near Ramelton.

Ulster Qualifying League Three pages include Ballymena RFC, Donegal Town Inishowen RFC and the RFC. Finn Valley RFC and Tir Chonaill RFC competes in both the Ulster Minor League North.

Association football

Finn Harps play in the League of Ireland and won promotion to the Premier Division in 2007 after a 6-3 aggregate win in the playoffs final. They are now back with their arch rivals Derry City FC, with whom they contest the IrelandNorth West Derby . There are many other clubs in Donegal, but none has achieved the status of Finn Harps.

Golf

There are a number of golf courses that Ballyliffin (Glashedy) Ballyliffin (Old), both of which are located in the Inishowen peninsula. Other courses of note are Murvagh (available outside Donegal Town) and Rosapenna (Sandy Hills) is located in Downings (near Carrigart). The Glashedy links have ranked 6th in a new ranking by Golf Digest is the best courses in Ireland. Old Links was ranked 28 Murvagh 36th and Sandy Hills 38th.

Bundoran regarded as one of the best surfing locations in Ireland and Europe.

Cricket

Cricket is essentially limited to the Laggan district and Finn Valley in the eastern part of the county. The town of Raphoe and the nearby village of St Johnston, both in The Laggan, are the traditional strongholds of cricket in the county. The game is primarily played and followed by members of County Donegal’s Protestant community.

Other sports

Donegal rugged landscape and the coastline is suitable for active sports such as climbing, mountain biking, mountain hiking, surfing and kite flying.

Panoramic views of Mount Errigal summit.

People

See also: Category: People from County Donegal.

Main article: List of Donegal people

one

  • Adomnán – or Saint Eunan , Abbot of Iona 679-704.
  • Pastor Dr. Francis Alison – prominent Presbyterian minister in the thirteen colonies and a leading member of the Synod of Philadelphia. At least three of the signers of the American Declaration of Independence were former students of Dr. Alison, who was born and raised in the parish of Leck, on the outskirts of Letterkenny.
  • William Allingham – Victorian poet from Bally.
  • Terrace – folk group.
  • Ian Anderson – Manx prominent politician who was a longstanding member of Tynwald. From Rathmullan.
  • Kay Maunchly Antonelli (born McNulty) – one of the original programmers of ENIAC during World War II. Born in Creeslough and raised in Philadelphia.
  • Alexander Armstrong – Arctic Explorer.

B

  • General Andrew Barnard – known senior British army commander, in particular in connection with the Napoleonic Wars. Born at Fahan Inishowen.
  • Bibi Baskin – former TV presenter with RTÉ. Now a business and practitioners of Ayurveda in Kerala. Born and raised in Ardara.
  • Neil Blaney – formerly a longstanding TD for the county and a former Irish Government Minister. Founder of Independent Fianna Fáil.
  • Oliver Bond (died 1796) – a possible St Johnston native who was the Dublin-based member of the United Irishmen.
  • Packie Bonner – former goalkeeper for both Ireland and Celtic Football Club.
  • Ed Boyce – former trade unionist and former radical socialist in Idaho and Montana, which later became a wealthy businessman. Helped form the Western Federation of Miners (WFM) 1893rd
  • Rev. Stopford Brooke – Anglican and later Unitarian clergyman and literary historian. He served as chaplain to Crown Princess Victoria of Prussia, 1863-1865, and later served as chaplain-in-ordinary to his mother, Queen Victoria, 1875-1880. Born and raised in Glendowan, just west of Letterkenny.
  • Isaac Butt – lawyer, MP and founder of the Irish Home Rule movement.Born and raised in Glenfin, a district near Ballybofey.

C

  • William C. Campbell – winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, born in Ramelton.
  • Clannad – folk group from Gweedore.
  • Séamus Coleman – football player for both Ireland and Everton Football Club. He is from Killybegs.
  • Columba – or Saint Colmcille , one of the three patron saints of Ireland.
  • Bob Cooper – a former vice president of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland and former long-standing director of the Fair Employment Commission for Northern Ireland. Born and raised in East Donegal.
  • Mary Coughlan – former Tánaiste and former TD for Donegal South-West. The first woman to be appointed agriculture minister in the Irish government.
  • Eithne Coyle – known Irish republican and socialist. Was a prominent member of both the Gaelic League and Cumann na mBan. From Killult, near Falcarragh.

D

  • Breandán de Gallai – actor, TV host and dancers from Gweedore. Former lead dancer with Riverdance .
  • John Doherty – famous Manchester-based Victorian trade unionist.From Buncrana.
  • Michelle Doherty – Dublin-based model and radio / television presenter from Northern Inishowen.
  • Moya Doherty – producer and co-founder of Riverdance , born in Pettigoe but grew up in Dublin.
  • Pearse Doherty TD – currently a TD for Donegal Sinn Féin spokesperson finance the Oireachtas. Born in Glasgow, but grew up and currently resides in Gweedore.

E

  • Felim Egan – artist based in Sandymount. Was born in County Donegal, but grew up in Strabane.
  • Enya – musicians and singers from Gweedore.
  • E. Rentoul Esler – Late Victorian and Edwardian writers. Born in Manorcunningham.

G

  • Patsy Gallacher (or Patsy Gallagher) – famous soccer player popularly known as the “Mighty Atom”. Played for both Ireland and Celtic FC. Born in Milford and raised in Glasgow.
  • Bridie Gallagher – singer known as the “Girl from Donegal ‘. Born and raised in Creeslough, she spent most of her adult life in Belfast.
  • Conrad Gallagher – chef and businessman from Letterkenny. Especially known for his work as a young chef at Peacock Alley in the center of Dublin.
  • Paddy “the Cope” Gallagher – businessman, author and champion of West Donegal. Founder of The Cope. He celebrated by An Post with a stamp in the beginning of 2006.
  • Pat “the Cope” Gallagher, TD – businessman who is a Fianna Fáil TD for Donegal. He was previously a Fianna Fáil MEP for the North West of Ireland. Grandson of Paddy “the Cope”.
  • Rory Gallagher – guitarist and singer. Born in Donegal family in Bally, he was up in Cork.
  • Tommy Gallagher – an SDLP politician who previously was an MLA for Fermanagh and South Tyrone
  • Dave Gallaher – the first All Blacks rugby captain. He was from Ramelton.
  • Conal Gallen – stand-up comedian from Ballybofey.
  • Shay Given – former goalkeeper for both Ireland and Newcastle United Football Club.

hrs

  • Paddy Harte – earlier years of the Fine Gael TD for Donegal North East and a former Irish Government Minister. Lifford but based on Raphoe.
  • Baron Hay of Ballyore – As Willie Hay, he served as Speaker of the Northern Ireland Assembly, 2007-2014. Lord Hay of Ballyore also served as an MLA for Foyle until 2014.
  • Cahir Healy – a journalist who was a very prominent Irish nationalist politician and who was a long-standing MP for County Fermanagh.Born and raised near Mount Charles

I

  • Professor John Kells Ingram – economist, Irish patriot and poet who was based at Trinity College.
  • Major General James Murray Irwin – leading senior physician in the British Army. From Manorcunningham.

J

  • Major Robert Johnston – recipient of the Victoria Cross and the rugby union international

L

  • Brigadier Andrew Lewis – military commanders, on the American side in the Revolutionary War. Born in County Donegal and raised in Virginia colony.
  • The 4th Viscount Lifford – a peer who once served as Deputy Lieutenant of County Donegal. He also served as High Sheriff of Donegal, 1841-1845. Lord Lifford was also a prominent businessman in the county, which serves as chairman of the Finn Valley Railway c. 1860. [32] He also served as president of the West Donegal Railway. He sat as an Irish Representative Peer in the House of Lords, 1856-1887.
  • Dr. Michael Logue – Cardinal who served as the Catholic Primate of all Ireland and archbishop of Armagh.
  • Professor Pat Loughrey – current warden of Goldsmith College, part of the University of London. Former Controller (or manager) of BBC Northern Ireland, from 1994 to 2000, and former head of the BBC and Regions, 2000-2009. From Ray, near Ramelton.

Mac / Mc

  • Mici Mac Gabhann – author, farmer and businessman from Cloughaneely. Known for writing Rotha Mór an tSaoil , which is mainly the story of his life as a miner in Butte and the Klondike in the 1880s and 1890s.
  • Patrick MacGill – author.
  • Mr MacLochlainn – formerly a Sinn Féin TD for Donegal North East.
  • Ray McAnally – actor and theater director.
  • Frank McBrearty, Sr. – The tax collector and businessman from Raphoe, where his company is based. Famously, he and his family were victims of police harassment by the Garda Síochána in the 1990s. His experiences, and those of some other people, led to the establishment of the Morris Tribunal in March 2002 that investigated widespread corruption Garda in County Donegal.
  • Neil McBride, Poet, author and farmer from Creeslough, who also became infamous in a court case in which he was defended by Patrick Pearse, in 1905.
  • Frankie McCafferty – Belfast-based actor, best known for his role as Donal Docherty in Ballykissangel the end of 1990.
  • Only McCallion – film director and producer. Especially known for directing Forrest advertising done Metz alcopop 2001. The ad is best known for featuring a character called “Judderman”.
  • Colonel Michael McCorkell – British Army soldier who became a prominent UUP politicians in Derry. He served as Lord Lieutenant of County Londonderry, 1975-2000. Born in Buncrana.
  • Basil McCrea, MLA – prominent Unionist politician in Northern Ireland Assembly. Now leaders NI21, he was a former member of the UUP. He was born in Ramelton.
  • Columba McDyer – the first person from County Donegal to win the All-Ireland senior medal when he played for Cavan in the 1947 All Ireland finals at the Polo Grounds in upper Manhattan, New York City. He later managed to Donegal team.
  • The Very Reverend Canon James McDyer – Catholic priest who was a champion of the rights of people in southwest County Donegal in the mid to late twentieth century, especially during his time as a parish priest in Glencolumbkille.
  • Brian McEniff – Businessman previously many years head of the Donegal senior football team, a team that won the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship in, 1992. Head of Ireland Compromise Rules team, 2000-2001.
  • Keith McErlean – Dublin-based actor. Known in Ireland for their parts as Barry in Bachelors Walk , Adam Duffy in Trivia , and Shane Harte Raw , all television programs made for RTÉ. Born and raised in Carndonagh.
  • Dr. Daniel McGettigan – Catholic Primate of all Ireland and archbishop of Armagh.
  • Dinny McGinley – earlier years of the Fine Gael TD for Donegal South-West. He served as Minister for the Gaeltacht at the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, 2011-2014.
  • Patrick McGinley – author, from Glencolumbkille.
  • Seán McGinley – actor. Born in Pettigoe but grew up near Ballycastle.
  • Frank McGuinness – playwrights, especially known for writing both theFactory Girls and observe the Sons of Ulster marching towards the Somme . Born and raised in Buncrana, he has been based at University College Dublin (UCD), as writer-in-residence for many years now. He has lectured at the University of Ulster.
  • Jim McGuinness – head of the Donegal senior football team, 2010-2014, a team that won the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship in 2012.Has also been, since November 2012, as the Performance Consultant at Celtic FC in Glasgow.
  • Joe McHugh TD – currently a Fine Gael TD for Donegal. Married to Olwyn Enright, a business and former TD for Laois-Offaly. Deputy McHugh is from Carrigart.
  • Martin McHugh – businessman and commentator on Gaelic football for BBC Northern Ireland. Was a member of the Donegal senior football team that won the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship in the 1992 final.
  • Fr. Ernan McMullin – philosopher priest who was based at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana for many years. He was from Ballybofey.
  • James McNulty activist for Irish independence in Creeslough during the Easter Rising.
  • Roy McNulty – former president of Short Brothers of Belfast. Born and raised in Raphoe.

M

  • Charles Macklin – London-based actor, director and writer of the eighteenth century from Northern Inishowen. Especially in connection with the Theatre Royal Drury Lane.
  • Pastor Francis Makemie – founder of Presbyterianism in what became the United States. He was from Ramelton.
  • Margo – singer from The Rosses. Older sister Daniel O’Donnell.
  • Anthony Molloy – captain of the Donegal team that won the All-Ireland, 1992. He is from Ardara.
  • General Robert Montgomery – proconsul and military commanders in British India. From Moville Inishowen.
  • Michael Murphy – captain of the Donegal team that won the All-Ireland in 2012. He is from Glen Willy, a small town close to Letterkenny.
  • Henry Musgrave, DL – was a Northern Irish businessman and philanthropist. Involved in many business concerns, including Donegal Railway Company. [33] [34] In 1913, Henry Musgrave paid for a tower to be built in the Church of Ireland church påGlencolumbkille, near the family’s country estate. He also left the legacy to this church and Kilcar Parish Church in his will. On 1 March 1917, Musgrave made an honorary burgess of the city of Belfast. He was also a great juror ochhög Sheriff Donegal for 1909-1910 and became Deputy Lieutenant of both the city of Belfast and Donegal.

O

  • Conor O’Devany – Martyr. Born near Raphoe.
  • Cahir O ‘Doherty (Cahir O’Dougherty or Cahir O’Doherty) – last reigning Gaelic Lord Inishowen. Originally an ally of the English, led the young Chieftain a rebellion against the English crown in the 1608th
  • Malachi O’Doherty – Belfast-based author and journalist who writes forthe Belfast Telegraph, and is a regular contributor to the Sunday Sequence on BBC Radio Ulster. Married to Maureen Boyle, a poet from Sion Mills, he was born iMuff in Inishowen.
  • Aodh Ruadh Ó Domhnaill (Red Hugh O’Donnell) – second last king of Tír Chonaill. Known Gaelic prince in the 1590s and early 1600s. Known for his part in the nine-year war. The film The Fighting Prince of Donegal , was released in 1966, was made about him.
  • Maghnus Ó Domhnaill (Manus O’Donnell) – King of Tír Chonaill for much of the first half of the sixteenth century and taught Irish Renaissance prince. Ordered life Columba to be printed.
  • Daniel O’Donnell – singers.
  • Dr. Patrick O’Donnell – Cardinal who served as the Catholic Primate of all Ireland and archbishop of Armagh.
  • Peadar O’Donnell – Irish revolutionary and socialist.
  • Gavin Ó Fearraigh – model and actor from Gweedore. Best known in Ireland to play Conal Daly in Ros na run on TG4. He also appeared onCelebrity Jigs ‘n’ Reels in 2007 on RTÉ first
  • Séamus Ó Grianna – Irish language writers.
  • Cathal Ó Searcaigh – Irish language poet of Cloughaneely.

P

  • Thomas Pringle TD – former trawlerman now an independent TD for Donegal. Killybegs.
  • The Patterson people group

R

  • Gerry Robinson – businessman and former head of Granada Television
  • Brid Rodgers – a former MLA who was former SDLP deputy leader and former Northern Ireland Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development. Born and raised in Gweedore.
  • John D Ruddy – actor and performer best. Born and raised in the letter.

S

  • Kevin Sharkey – Dublin-based actor, artist, businessman and former model. Where a television presenter at The Roxy on ITV in the late 1980s. Raised and educated in Killybegs.
  • Kevin Sharkey – currently a broadcast journalist with BBC Northern Ireland.
  • Dr. George Otto Simms – Church of Ireland Primate of All Ireland and Archbishop of Armagh. A well-known historian, he was Lifford.
  • Ricky Simms – London-based manager of Usain Bolt. Simms was born in Milford.
  • Andrew Simpson – Actor who played in both song for a Raggy Boy andNotes on a Scandal . Born in Altnagelvin hospital but raised in Inishowen.
  • James Star Ride – deputy head of the Metropolitan Police in London in the early 1970s. Born in Carrigans but grew up in Magherafelt.
  • Major General Joe Sweeney – leading Irish Republican Army commander during the Revolutionary War. He later served as a leading Irish Army commander during the Irish Civil War. In the early 1920s he served as a TD MPoch West Donegal in the 1st Dáil and later as Pro-Treaty TD for Donegal. From Burton.
  • Pauric Sweeney – London-based luxury handbag designer. Born in County Donegal and educated at Blackrock College and Temple University.

T

  • John Toland – Protestant philosopher of the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century. He was of Ardagh, a townland near Ballyliffin.

Surname

The most common surnames in County Donegal at the time of the United Kingdom Census 1901: [35]

  1. Gallagher
  2. Doherty
  3. O’Donnell
  4. Boyle
  5. McLaughlin
  6. Sweeney
  7. kelly
  8. McGinley
  9. McFadden
  10. Section

See also

  • List of towns and villages in Ireland
  • List of abbeys and priories in Ireland (County Donegal)
  • People from County Donegal
  • Donegal County (Ireland Parliament constituency)
  • Earagail Arts Festival
  • High Sheriff Donegal
  • Lord Lieutenant of Donegal
  • SS Donegal
  • troubles
  • Wild Atlantic Way

References

  1. ^ Jump up to: ab “County Donegal”. Central Bureau of Statistics . In 2016.
  2. Jump up ^ “2006 Annual Report of the Ulster Scots” (PDF). North-South Ministerial Council.
  3. Jump up ^ “2002 Annual Report of the Ulster Scots” (PDF). North-South Ministerial Council.
  4. Jump up ^ Tourism Ireland – Yeirly Report 2009
  5. Jump up ^ “Donegal Library Services”. Donegallibrary.ie. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  6. Jump up ^ North West Ireland.
  7. Jump up ^ “Derry and Donegal Sinn Féin Councillors join forces to push the North West tourism”. Sinnfein.ie. 16 February 2009. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  8. ^ Jump up to: ab Brian Lacy (Editor), archaeological survey County Donegal , P. 1. Donegal County Council, Lifford, 1983rd
  9. Jump up ^ For the 1653 and 1659 figures from the Civil Survey Census of those years, the paper Mr. Hardinge Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865.
  10. Jump up ^ Census of post 1821 figures.
  11. Jump up ^ “A collection of British Historical Population Reports”.University of Essex. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  12. Jump up ^ “NISRA – Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (c) 2013 ‘.Nisranew.nisra.gov.uk. 27 September 2010. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  13. Jump up ^ Lee, JJ (1981). “On the accuracy of pre-famine Irish censuses”. In the Gold Strom, JM; Clarkson, LA Irish population, economy and society: Essays in Honour of the late KH Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press.
  14. Jump up ^ Mokyr, Joel, O Grada, Cormac (November 1984). “New Developments in the Irish population history, 1700-1850”. Economic history eView. 37 (4) :. 473-488 doi: 10.1111 / j.1468 -0289.1984.tb00344.x.
  15. Jump up ^ Patterson, Edward M (1962). The County Donegal Railway.Dawlish: David and Charles. pp. 9-10.
  16. Jump up ^ Morton, O. 2003. The marine macroalgae in County Donegal, Ireland. Bull.Ir. Biogeog. Soc., 27: 3-164
  17. Jump up ^ Ennis, T. 2014. The presence of Dactylorhiza purple(T.Stephenson and TSStephenson) soo Ir Nat. J. 33 : 128
  18. Jump up ^ Sleeman, PD et al in 2009. The small-bodied Badgers ( Meles meles (L.) in Rutland Island, Co. Donegal. Ir Nat J. 30: 1-6 ..
  19. Jump up ^ “Crex Crex corncrake, priority species Northern Ireland”.
  20. Jump up ^ “Dolmen Centre, Kilclooney, Portnoo, Co.Donegal” .Dolmencentre.com. Retrieved July 9, 2013.
  21. Jump up ^ Renamed “County Tirconaill” in 1922 by resolution of the County Council (. Place Name Confusion – Donegal or Tirconaill , The Irish Times, April 24, 1924). After historians and Gaelic scholars pointed out that the historical territory Tirconaill did not include the entire county, Donegal name again adopted in 1927 ( Back to “Donegal” , The Irish Times November 22, 1927).
  22. Jump up ^ Connolly, SJ, Oxford Companion to Irish History , page 129. Oxford University Press, 2002. ISBN 978-0-19-923483-7
  23. Jump up ^ County “wiped off crisis HQ maps.” The Belfast Telegraph .21 April 2010.
  24. Jump up ^ Donegal “disappear” from the crisis maps. Ocean FM. 21 April 2010.
  25. Jump up ^ Donegal Gaeltacht statistics
  26. Jump up ^http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/pdf/2014/en.act.2014.0001.pdf
  27. Jump up ^ “Even Donegal voted YES in the marriage referendum”.February 23, 2015. Archived from the original February 24, 2016.
  28. Jump up ^ “Closing” Derry Road “a great loss to Ireland – Derry Journal” .Hämtad 20 August, 2013.
  29. ^ Jump up to: ab Willie Cumming, Duncan McLaren and TJ O’Meara, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal , p. 96. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (Niah), Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin, 2014.
  30. Jump up ^ who was who in America historical volume, 1607-1896.Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who. In 1963.
  31. Jump up ^ “Donegal Gaelic football and hurling clubs.” Clubgaa.ie.
  32. Jump up ^ Bradshaw’s Guide. WJ Adams, 1864
  33. Jump up ^ Bloomfield Land and Building Company
  34. Jump up ^ BBC Your Paintings, Henry Musgrave Henrietta Rae
  35. Jump up ^ “Donegal Genealogy resources and Parish Register – Ulster” .Forebears.co.uk.

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